Heavy or Light Weight Tile?


  #1  
Old 10-28-04, 09:18 AM
joseph123
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Heavy or Light Weight Roof Tile? Help!

Hi.

We need to replace our wood shake roof in our home in Southern California (Orange County area) which has approx 40 squares, 8/12 pitch roof, Tudor home.

My wife and I have been looking at the "Light" weight tiles like Eagle lite tiles, but we don't like any of the colors. The standard weight tiles come in many more colors, but the weight of standard tiles is around 1,000lb per square. The "light" tiles are something like 720lb per square.

We are concerned about having such a heavy roof even if the engineering report gives the ok. What do you think?

We looked at asphalt shingles, but they look cheap and would not go with the homes in the area - most everyone else has tile roofs.

On a different but related subject, anyone here heard of Protex slate tiles? These are very light, but we are concerned that this is very new product and what will happen if the company goes under (like cal-shake, etc).

On roofer is pushing a underlayment called "StormGuard" - it is a thick rubber material with a stick under part which is used intead of say 30lb tar paper.

Any and all comments & suggestions welcome.

Thank You.

Very confused
Joseph
 

Last edited by joseph123; 10-28-04 at 10:01 AM.
  #2  
Old 10-28-04, 02:07 PM
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There are good synthetic (imitation) slates out there that look very good. I'm most familiar with TAMKO's Lamarite. It weighs just under 500 lbs per square so there's no need for all of the special structural support. It mimics Vermont Slate.
The imitation slate industry is riddled with "short-timers", so your concern that the company may "go under" is a legitimate concern. That's why I'm most familiar with Tamko. They are a major roofing supplier that has been around for more than 50 years.

There are others out there as well. You may want to look around on the net to find out what is best for you.

The Storm Guard is a peel-and-stick waterproofing underlayment.
Most professional contractors use this type of material under metal and tile.
There are many types of peel-and-sticks, Stormguard is just one brand.
Almost every major roofing manufacturer makes one.

I would recommend using one.

Good luck.
 
  #3  
Old 10-28-04, 09:03 PM
J
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Tamko has only had these fake slate roofs for a couple of years. Even big, old companies can have problem products.. Remember OC "Mira-vista". But I agree that Tamko is a better risk than most. They have a reputation of standing behind their products and "doing the right thing". I am a fan of these plastic/rubber slates. I did a 2,000 sqs Entermit Slate jhob in Tahoe 10 years ago and it looks great.
Jim
 
  #4  
Old 10-28-04, 10:12 PM
joseph123
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Originally Posted by Delirious Nomad
Good luck.

Thank you so much for your recommendation. I have not heard of that brand.

Another side question if I may. We have received several quotes in the price range of $16-$20k for 40 squares, 8/12 pitch tudor house. Home depot was the odd-ball quote at 39k

Every contractor we talk to who we like, each one of them contradicts the other as far as what to use and how to do the roof. The scary part for me is that they all make sense. I had not realized just how crazy this field is. I can give details later, but I get a headeach each time.

How do I pick out the right contractor? The nicest contractors seem to be the crazy ones. You can PM me if you feel more comfortable talking off line.

Thanks again,
Joseph
 
  #5  
Old 10-30-04, 10:55 AM
joseph123
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Originally Posted by jmorgan1
But I agree that Tamko is a better risk than most.
I just called several roofing supply companies in the Orange County area and most do not carry Lamarite.

One one store that was able to order Lamarite was $375 per square - OUCH.

That's 15,000 just for the roof tiles! I need something more in line with reality.
 
  #6  
Old 10-30-04, 08:39 PM
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Hmm....That sounds way too high from what I've seen.
It may have something to do with the freight costs all the way out there.
I've seen it in the $275 range closer to the middle of the country.
I could be wrong.

Something still smells funny about that cost, though.
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-04, 06:13 AM
J
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I'll get a Tamko price in the morning and post. Price will be delivered to SLC, UT. Price sounds high to me.
Jim
 
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Old 11-02-04, 04:53 AM
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$275/sq for Tamko Lamarite. Discussed w/ a friend who has insatlled 3-4 of these. Says they went on good in warm weather, but shattered when cold. Tamko requires 40 degrees or better for installation. Carlisle Ecostar may be a better choice for cool weather installations.
Jim
 
  #9  
Old 11-02-04, 05:53 AM
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That price sounds more like what I've seen.
I would check out the Ecostar, but remember that you are not comparing apples to apples.
 
  #10  
Old 11-02-04, 07:23 AM
J
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What do you mean not apples to apples? Both are plastic/rubber imitation slates.
Jim
 
  #11  
Old 11-02-04, 08:11 AM
joseph123
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After talking with a TAMKO rep, he asked me to call a distributor in my local area called ABC Roofing.

They gave me the wonderful price of $295 per square

To give you some comparisons of prices for materials around here (not an apple to apple comparison):

$295 - Lamarite
$125 - Eagle Lite
$210 - Protex

I don't mind paying more, but Lamarite still seems a bit high. That's about 2.5 times more than lighter weight Eagle product.
 

Last edited by joseph123; 11-02-04 at 03:25 PM.
  #12  
Old 11-03-04, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by jmorgan1
What do you mean not apples to apples? Both are plastic/rubber imitation slates.
Jim


A Lexus and a Pinto are both cars.
Get sample pieces of each and you can see for yourself.
 
  #13  
Old 11-03-04, 08:20 AM
joseph123
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Going back to the original subject: How do you folks here feel about the weight of standard tiles even if the home engineering report says ok?

With standard weight, that's about 1,000 - 1,200 pounds per square. With my house of 40 squares, that's 48,000 pounds of weight over our heads. Should I be concerned or am I making it a bigger deal than it really is?
 

Last edited by joseph123; 11-04-04 at 08:31 AM.
  #14  
Old 11-09-04, 09:59 PM
joseph123
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TAMRAK Slate Tiles

Hi.

A rep dropped some of those tiles at my home - what an absolutely possitely UGLY looking tiles those are.

My eyes are still hurting. Do people seriously put those on?
 
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Old 11-10-04, 06:42 AM
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Never heard of Tamrak slate tiles.
 
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Old 11-10-04, 11:34 PM
joseph123
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Sorry, I meant the TAMKO Lamarite.

That is ONE UGLY TILE man. Looks cheap, thing, and the edges curl up on some tiles.
 
  #17  
Old 11-11-04, 05:42 AM
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Not sure what you looked at.
The edges of Lamerite don't curl. It is a much more brittle product than the others I've seen. It will break before it curls.

It mimics Vermont Slate. Many slate manufacturers do that.
If you don't like the looks, that's ok. Many others do.
But if you don't like the Lamerite, then you wouldn't like the real Vermont Slate.

To each, his own.
 
  #18  
Old 11-11-04, 11:02 AM
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Tiles

Back to the original question concerning "To Tile -or- Not to Tile"
If a structural engineer has OK'd it, then go for it.
Tile can be a 100 year roof. And ALWAYS use a good underlayment. In my humble opinion, (as my partner in crime Mr. Morgan will no doubt agree)...Grace Ice and Water Sheild is the best. Some certain manufacturers claim there underlayment is "re-positionable for ease of installation"...to me that means.. IT DOES NOT STICK!
Grace's product on the other hand...if you try to pull it up..some of the plywood is coming with it.

I am currently specifying the rehabilitation of a historic clay tile roof installed in 1926. 90% of the original tile will be re-installed. The 10% is simply a estimated loss factor for removal and re-installation. When completed we have no reason to doubt in another 80 years it will still be in-service!


Good Luck!...and post some photos of the final outcome!
 
 

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