Roof Mold And Pressure Washing


  #1  
Old 01-10-05, 04:06 PM
Larry Alan
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Roof Mold And Pressure Washing

I have some roof mold.

I live in Florida (the Tampa area), and the mold (just small areas) is on the West side of my roof. I understand that "normally" mold occurs on the North facing parts of the roof.

My Home Owners Association (don't you just love 'em?) says I have to "pressure wash" (to quote the letter) my roof to remove the dark mold.

I've read somewhere that "pressure washing" does more harm than good to shingles. I'm looking for some authoritative references that back that up. I searched here and on Google but didn't find anything. (Maybe I didn't use the correct search terms.)

I just want to point out to the HOA that "pressure washing" shingles is the wrong thing to recommend and that they are only inviting more problems for the home owners.

Can somebody help me?
 
  #2  
Old 01-10-05, 05:08 PM
J
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First let me say, to each their own, but I'm not a big fan of home owners associations, I like the theory...it's MY house, and if you don't want to look at it... then DON'T. but like i said, whatever suits any given person, that's why we live in America.

On to your question:

Pressure washing can strip the "gravel" off of asphalt shingles(unless you set the pressure VERY low, in which case it wouldn't remove mold either, if that's what is on your roof, which it may not be, more about that in a second ), and I would say for that reason it should not be recommended.

What you may have, rather than mold, is simply wind-blown dust/dirt/chimney soot/etc., that would also follow the "west/north" mystery, as wind, in general blows from west to east. Try a garden hose, from the top down if it's possible and within the realm of safety(if you can only do it from the ground it's OK, but better from atop the roof for a couple reasons to follow). If you can safely get on your roof(not too steep), assist the garden hose with a broom, or other type brush, but nothing terribly stiff in nature(might as well power wash it if you're going to scrub all the gravel off anyway).

Bottom line is, the HOA wants the stuff off your roof, you signed the agreement, so your pretty much bound to clean it, BUT, it's none of their business HOW you go about that, and their recommendation of pressure washing isn't the best route to take as a first resort IMHO.(or really even a last resort for that matter)
 
  #3  
Old 01-11-05, 01:31 PM
Larry Alan
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You can't find a nice half-way new house around here (East of Tampa a bit) that isn't in a HOA. Believe me, I looked and looked.

Thanks for the info. You confirmed what I thought. It bothered me because some people might not know better and actually pressure wash their roof and take years off its life ... if the hurricanes don't do it first.

I'm gonna send this info to the HOA. Maybe they'll just say "clean" in the future.
 
  #4  
Old 01-11-05, 02:59 PM
J
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Absolutely..."clean thoroughly in any manner you see fit to use" would be much better. Or even simply, "...restore it's original color."
 
  #5  
Old 01-11-05, 07:18 PM
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They definitely need to take the words "pressure wash" out of their HOA instructions. "Pressure washing" is a big no-no to the shingle manufacturers.

As mentioned by jproffer, pressure washing will knock the granules off the shingle which will expose the asphalt underneath. The granules serve only one function (other than make your roof colorful)....they protect the asphalt, which is the shingle's waterproofing, from the sun's UV rays. Without granules, the exposed asphalt would deteriorate much faster and drastically shorten the life of the shingle.

Mold/algae/fungus is very common along the gulf coast and other humid areas.

The most popular theory is this:
Mold typically grows on the north and west sides first because the sun rises in the southeast most of the time (since we live in the northern hemisphere). Therefore, the north and west sides of a roof tend to hold more moisture since the morning dew burns off slower.

You can use a very low pressure wash with a bleach solution to wash off the mold/algae.
The most common "home remedy" is 1/3 water, 1/3 bleach, and 1/3 TriSodium Phosphate (TSP). The more bleach, the better, however, your plants on the ground do not like bleach....so beware of the runoff.

Basically, you could spray your solution on the area, let it sit for 15 minutes or so, then wash it off. Darker areas may need to be sprayed more than once.

There are many companies that clean roofs in Florida. You can look them up on the internet.

Good luck.
 
  #6  
Old 01-12-05, 01:20 PM
Larry Alan
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Originally Posted by Delirious Nomad
You can use a very low pressure wash with a bleach solution to wash off the mold/algae.
The most common "home remedy" is 1/3 water, 1/3 bleach, and 1/3 TriSodium Phosphate (TSP). The more bleach, the better, however, your plants on the ground do not like bleach....so beware of the runoff.
Thanks! I'm getting more ammo for the HOA!
 
  #7  
Old 02-03-05, 08:25 AM
Roof Cleaner
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As mentioned by others, pressure washing a roof is not good. For an asphalt shingle roof, it can cause a lot of damage.

Bleach is one option, but there are other options as well - such as preventing the algae growth before it starts.

If you would like to e-mail me, I can send you an article about roof cleaning that explains the usual options - and the benefits and downsides of each.


John Browne
 

Last edited by majakdragon; 02-03-05 at 08:56 AM. Reason: E-mails are not permitted in threads.
  #8  
Old 02-03-05, 02:31 PM
Larry Alan
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Originally Posted by Roof Cleaner
If you would like to e-mail me, I can send you an article about roof cleaning that explains the usual options - and the benefits and downsides of each.
John Browne
I'd appreciate the article! But I can't figure out how to email you.

I'm not that familiar with the software here.
 
  #9  
Old 02-03-05, 04:17 PM
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Just click on his name at the top of his post.
When the menu comes down, click on "visit my website".
Go there.
I'm sure you can contact him from there.
 
 

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