Layers of Roofing


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Old 03-30-05, 09:45 AM
yfct
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Layers of Roofing

Hi, the existing roof of my house is the architecture one. It is due for replacement. Can I lay the new roof on top of it (there is only one layer), or must I remove the old one since it's the architectural type. Thanks!
 
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Old 03-30-05, 09:55 AM
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yfct, Welcome to the DIY Forums.
Before the experts answer your question, I will say that a lot depends on local codes. If you go to past posts in this Forum you will find different answers to the same question.
Keep checking this post as answers come in at all times. Good luck.
 
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Old 03-30-05, 12:44 PM
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Generally, in areas I'm familar with, you're allowed up to 2 layers of what I call "the basic dimensional" shingle. This basic style is made by a number of manufacturers, going by names like Oakridge, Prestique, Timberlines, Heritage, etc.

You can't go over a number of the newer/beefier styles like Presidentials TLs, Grand Canyons, Grand Seqouias, etc.

As the DRAGON said, check with YOUR codes.
 
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Old 03-30-05, 07:45 PM
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Roof Over

The very best advice I can give you is to do a tear off. Now here is why. You have arc shingles on it now. If you do a roof over, your new shingles will not lay flat. They may look like they are, but that is an illusion. You new shingles will get ridges in them after about 6 months depending on how much sun they get. You will be able to see the ridges from way down the street. My advice, tear them off. Good Luck
 
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Old 03-31-05, 05:55 AM
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One last "thot"....

There's ALWAYS the best way of doing things, and bad way of doing things.
Then there's the way of doing things which are wholly acceptable and required by most homeowners given the budget they have to work with. Personally, I'll not compromise a roof installation on functionality. But if a homeowner wants a roof, needs a roof, but cannot afford extra costs related to tearoff, when that tearoff is NOT required by the manufacturer or local building code authority,
then I will give that homeowner exactly what he/she needs.
And I'll still offer the very same labor warranty as I would have had I stripped off the old.
That said, it's always a bit of a compromise when recovering a roof, flat oir pitched.

Liken it to painting a car. How many have customers had all the old paint fully stripped off prior to prepping, repriming, painting, etc.
Why isn't that done EVERY time?

moola.

Not the greatest example, but it's the one which popped into my head.
 
 

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