Zinc hot-dip mild steel gutters question...


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Old 04-04-05, 09:06 AM
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Zinc hot-dip mild steel gutters question...

Hi:

I have a home built in 1984 in the Dallas area.

The gutters have held up pretty well given the age of the house, but when I talk to contractors they tell me that I should try to get as much life out of my existing gutters as possible because they are putting aluminum on these days as a replacement.

That said, I'm beginning to notice corrosion and an interested in trying to stop it as much as possible.


I notice that at the base of several of my downspouts there is a bolt with a fairly thick-guaged wire connected to it and then going underground.

Is it possible that this leads to a sacrificial anode that may need to be replaced after 20 years??


thanks in advance...
 
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Old 04-04-05, 11:13 AM
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It could also be grounding for antenna(s) or a lightning protection system..
What type of guttering is up there? Galvanized? Copper?
Yes the standard "cheepie" is seamless aluminum guttering. However you can put up whatever you want. Alum, paint-grip steel, Coated steel...all the way up to to copper.
 
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Old 04-04-05, 11:46 AM
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It's all galvanized guttering as far as I can tell.

Incidentally, I called a corrosion engineering company during lunch & they said that it is more than liekly a ground for lightning protection.

They said that an anode placed into the soil would be of no use since the guttering is not in contact with the soil...it's downspouts dump directly into a a pvc conveyance system.

They said that the corrosion I'm seeing is just due to atmospheric exposure and that intermittantly, wetness contained within the gutters will act as a dielectic and cause corrosion like what I'm seeing.

They said that really the only thing you can do is try to remove all of the rust and then eliminate the atmospheric exposure (paint, etc). Typically this is alot of work and that's why people usually just replace the gutters when its time rather than try to retoactively protect them further.


Anyway, if anyone else has any more guidance I'd be most appreciative.
 
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Old 04-04-05, 05:57 PM
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Wink

Thats a new one on me and boy have I put up a lot of galvanized gutters. As a anode forget it thats only on boats in salt water. Ill bet some one did that for lighting is all. Now years back had to make the gutter by hand on a sheet metal brake.
At that time about every two years we would clean the gutter out and make sure they where dry . Then put a heavy black paint with a asphalt base just inside and they would last and last.

ED
 
 

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