protecting from rain during reroof


  #1  
Old 04-07-05, 08:50 PM
gpelavin
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protecting from rain during reroof

We are having a new roof put on. Old cedar shake plus three or four layers of shingles removed, then new plywood, roofing paper, felt (I believe), then shingles put up. The contractor has the old roof off, and plywood and black roofing paper up (some sections have shingles already too). Rain was forecast and it is now raining. Here is my question: is just the black roofing paper okay? or should the whole roof be covered in tarps?

One more question: in the sections that have shingles up already, there are things like a metal triangle brace nailed (I presume they are nailed) into the roof, that have planks stretched accross them for the workers to stand on while they are working on the roof. Since this is on top of the finshed roof, is it a problem that there may be holes through the finish layer of shingles? How does this work with out compromising the finished roof?

Thank you for any insight and guidance you can give me!
 
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Old 04-08-05, 04:25 AM
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Roof Tarp

99 percent of the time your felt will be enough in most normal rains. I can assure you with a 4 roof tear off, and new sheeting, that the contractor will be more worried about tarping then you are. If he feels it needs tarping, he will tarp it. The triangles as you call them are called roof jacks. There are two ways they are put up. With one kind of nails, when they lift off the jacks, they will just hammer the nail heads down and seal the holes. The other type of nails, they will pull out and squirt in some sealer where the nail was. With some kinds of jacks, they are actually installed under the above shingle. These just slip off. Don't worry, they will not leak. Good Luck
 
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Old 04-08-05, 07:02 AM
gpelavin
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roofing felt soaked - okay to install shingles over it?

Thank you very much for the reply about the exposed felt cersus tarping the roof during the reroof. It is very helpful to have knoweldgable and objective giudance about the job - I appreciate your taking the time to moderate this forum!

Last night the felt held up through the rain okay as far as I can tell. What happened, though, is that there were two areas where the flashing had not been done right and it leaked into the house. I am in the process of addressing the damage with the contractor.

My question today is about the felt that is up on the roof. It is soaked through. The contractor says it is okay to put the shingles right up on top of it. I have two concerns: 1) the felt looks soaked and buckled and different from how it looked before it got wet - is the material still intact? 2) I don't like the idea of trapping all of that moisture in the roof. The contractor says it will dry out even once the shingles are installed on top of it. Do you have any guidance for me about this?

Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 04-08-05, 11:48 AM
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Felt underlayment has two primary functions:

The first has already served its purpose, which is to protect the deck in the event of rainfall prior to shingle application.

The second is to provide a seperation layer between the shingles and decking to prohibit oils and asphalts from being leeched out of the shingles by the decking. This can cause premature drying/embrittlement of the shingles.

Once the shingles are installed, the felt has zero waterproofing properties as it now has (pick a number) 5500 nail holes.

The felt apperently performed as intended. Any residual moisture will dry to the interior. The better your attic venting, the faster it will dry out.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 04-08-05, 04:30 PM
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Roofs I've seen which literally had no felt under the shingles fall into 2 general catagories:

1. Some water migration between the shingles...merely staining the wood.
2. Water migration between the shingles which destroyed the entire roof deck.

It's not like I've run accross many of these, but the ones I've run across do seem to indicate a longer-term purpose for felt.
 
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Old 04-08-05, 05:55 PM
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That brings up an interesting question I have- if the underlayment is just to protect the deck before shingling, what is the point behind something like ice and water shield? Is it to protect the deck in the event of ice dams where the water can sneak up under the shingles?
 
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Old 04-08-05, 07:05 PM
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Re roof

gpelevin:

I answered your questions in a reply to the private e-mail you sent me. Have a good day.

Jack
 
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Old 04-08-05, 07:06 PM
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That is the exact intended purpose for ice barrier, since it adhere's itself to the roof decking it's not longer possible for the water to infiltrate the attic space and cause all sorts of damage. It's also self sealing around any nails that pound throught it.
 
 

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