DIY roofwork for those afraid of heights?


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Old 04-21-05, 03:27 PM
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DIY roofwork for those afraid of heights?

I'm not quitting yet, and I have a couple days of rain ahead of me to rebuild my enthusiasm, but after getting as far as I have, I'm wondering how often professional roofers get called in by do-it-yourselfers who found out the hard way that they'd rather hire someone to do the job.

I have a generally straight forward roof.. I have a bungalo with an 8:12 pitch roof, with an addition that's maybe 4:12. I started with the 4:12 area which I've completed, and in the evenings after work I've done about 5 courses on the adjacent 8:12 roof... I'm obviously not so afraid of heights that I can't get up on the roof, but I definitely start freezing up a little if I get too close to the edge, and when it comes to working near the edge on the steep part of the roof, it makes small amounts of progress exhausting.

Or perhaps does anyone have any tips that might help one such as myself, who is a a little adventuresome-ness deficient, feel a little more secure?
 
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Old 04-21-05, 05:30 PM
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Perhaps some Xanax would help?

I hope you are using some roof jacks for the steep part? Plenty of roof jacks always makes me feel better. Heck on a 8:12 pitch, you're practically standing up!

Bottom line, if you don't feel safe, you probably aren't. Don't mess around when it comes to falling- it could be the end of the line. Either work safely, wear fall protection, or get the yellow pages.
 
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Old 04-22-05, 12:54 AM
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Yop should consider buying a harness setup. It would include an OSHA approved harness/belt, lanyard, rope, clip, and eyering attatchment which would be fastened to the ridge.
It's kind of a hassle, keeping the rope out of your way as you work, but it can provide you an extra sense of security, not to mention an extra level of REAL security.

After years of laughing off fall protection systems, we now use them on certain roofs when the height and/or pitch deems them a good idea. It took a broken leg, cracked ribs, collapsed lung, fractured pelvis, and recovery times to finally convince ..........
To each his own. But there's nothing "stupid' or "cowardly" about realizing where your at up there. Most all accidents have happened because guys forgot that.

By the way, if you were to choose to use this thing, it doesn't do any good unless you keep the length adjusted, and it's fully secured to the roof. They also make eyerings which are designed to be left in the roof. They come with their own flashing.
 
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Old 04-22-05, 02:06 AM
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my 2 cents

Hi
If you used a harness.
dont do like some idiot done before
Through the rope over the house and tied it to the bumper of his car.
He was removing snow from the back side of the house
his wife left to do some shopping and pull off
Guess what happen

cheers

pg
 
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Old 04-22-05, 03:22 AM
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Yeah.. I've got a bunch of roof jacks ready to go, so far I've just been doing what I can in the evenings so I've only done the first 5 courses. I removed the first 5 courses of old shingles then put down the ice and water shield, then put on the first two courses.. All from a ladder. Once I had that much down, I put on a pair of 90 degree roof jacks that I'm going to keep in place until I'm completely done with that side of the roof to stop anything that might fall or get dropped.

I don't have a harness yet, but I have one ordered. From the weather forecast, it looks like I've got a few days of rain ahead to pass the time while I'm waiting for the harness anyway.
 
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Old 04-22-05, 07:52 AM
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No....I "don't do like the idiot before".....

But falling off for no good reason is a thing of idiocy. Thing is we ALL have our moments of idiocy....but when it comes to being on a roof, it only takes .5 second worth of of it....and you're gone.
 
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Old 04-22-05, 09:03 PM
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Steep Roof

WillK
In answer to your first question, people call roofers all the time when they get to a point they are uncomfortable. An 8/12 roof is kind of steep. However, we still walk and 8/12, and do not use roof jacks until we start shingling. We also start our tear off from the top down. Have a good day.
 
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Old 04-26-05, 05:26 PM
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I just wanted to share my experience thus far regarding my progress and how I've chosen to proceed. I understand that for professionals the proceedure would typically be to tear off all the shingles, working from the top down, then lay down all the felt, then put on shingles.

My approach has been to work from the bottom up all the way, tearing off shingles and laying felt as I go, only tearing off enough shingles to lay 1 strip of felt at a time. I chose this approach because I'm a one man amatuer crew, much of my work is in the evenings or in short periods of time when Michigan weather presents an opportunity to progress... Plus there's my fear of heights and not really wanting to be far up a roof without a level surface nearby to stand, sit or prop myself up on.

At least, that was my original plan. That and the fact I couldn't think of any reason why the shingles had to be torn off until I was ready to put new shingles on that far up...

Based on my experience (and subsequent contemplation of changing the project from a roof building project to an ark building project) I'm thinking maybe things are done the way they are for the sake of preventing leaks if it rains on a partially finished roof.

Still, it doesn't change the other logistical considerations. But I have made adjustments. Now, when I tear off shingles from the bottom up, I leave enough old shingles so they will overlap my new felt and the top of my last row of new shingles that I lay. So far, it has worked well (whereas my initial approach didn't)
 
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Old 04-26-05, 06:09 PM
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WillK

I understand fully what you are doiing. It is a project. But since you through out alot of big words and theories, I thought I would let you know a couple of things as to why professionals do it like they do it. Now, they way you are doing it, at what point do you sweep your roof, or don't you ? This is a very important part of roofing. Number 2. Roofers tear from the top down, so they can replace their Style D, vents, and any flashing. They roof from the bottom up. Now as I said, I understand your situation, and why your doing it like your doing it. Good Luck.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 04:11 AM
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I guess what you could think of is that I'm doing my roofing in 3 foot sections, and for each section I tear off shingles, then go back and pull up the left over nails, then I tear off the old tar paper. At this point I sweep, although I've also already thrown large chunks of moss and pieces of shingle down to the gutters. It's pretty clean when I roll the tar paper on.

Aside from chunks of moss, most of the debris falls between the cracks in the decking before I even get to sweep. (it has boards as opposed to plywood.) A little bit slides to the top edge of the new tar paper, but I've been able to get to that with a small wisk broom. If I could I'd bring a shop vac up to the roof.. I considered an air nozzle, but I know from working on cars that trying to blow the debris out would probably just push some of it further under the tar paper.
 
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Old 04-27-05, 06:20 AM
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>> most of the debris falls between the cracks in the decking before I
>> even get to sweep. (it has boards as opposed to plywood.)

Roofs that have "large" gaps like that often get decked with roof sheathing -or- if the gaps are fairly straight, they can be filled in with solid wood that is of the same thickness. That way you will have solid nailing everywhere and if the roof gets poked, you won't punch holes in either the tarpaper or the shingles.

I caught the ark building comment. You're a funny guy.
 
 

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