Copper or rubberized asphalt


  #1  
Old 07-14-05, 07:22 PM
kyderby
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Copper or rubberized asphalt

Hi,

I live in a 1923 Tudor home in Northeast Ohio. It still has the original slate roof (which has been maintained quite well), but the copper valleys are starting to go. We have one area in particular that is causing us problems-- three valleys (from the very peak of the house) feed into one pretty large trough which then runs into a smaller valley and into the downspout. Right now, the valleys are all copper, but a previous owner replaced the trough with what seems to be an asphalt roofing material. We've had three roofers out and the one we've used in the past (very reputable, works only on slate) recommends installing "modified bitumen (rubberized asphalt)" in the trough area, while the other two companies say copper is the way to go (it'll last longer, architectural integrity, etc.) I know that copper is more expensive, but we plan to be in the house for 15+ years and I don't want to have to address the same problem down the line.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated,
Sara
 
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Old 07-15-05, 04:14 AM
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kyderby

Here again you need to make the decision. The rubberized asphalt will last about 25 to 30 years. What wears it out is the sun dries the oils in it. On the other hand, the contractor with copper is correct also. So now you have two good guys with 2 different products which are both good. Even though I have done alot of copper, I would think I would stick with my slate roofer. Just a feeling I have. If he has given you good service in the past, there is no reason for him to lead you astray. Good Luck
 
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Old 07-15-05, 07:18 AM
kyderby
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Thanks...

For the advice.

Sara
 
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Old 07-15-05, 07:55 AM
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Wink

How to go how to go both sound good. The only thing Id say is that with the copper valley we brake them up so you have whats called a storm valley like small W in it .This way you get two sides for the water to wear the valley out with the copper.

ED
 
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Old 07-15-05, 10:35 AM
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Sara,
I would go with both..
Fully adhered high-temp Ice and Water Sheild in the valleys and trough area (I&W Guard is probably code in your area), with all new copper. It will be the only time you'll pay for it. If done correctly, It will be 50+yrs before it needs attention again.

Good Luck!
 
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Old 07-15-05, 10:37 AM
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Check out "The Roof Tile Institute"
You'll find lots of information on how to correctly perform this detail.
 
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Old 07-25-05, 05:22 AM
J
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I'm with Shinstr.
Jim
 
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Old 07-31-05, 06:18 PM
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Kind of difficult to know what you mean by a "trough" but I will take this to mean that it is a built-in concealed gutter that leads into the downspout.

Copper will last almost forever. Once installed it slowly develops an oxide coating that protects it from further degradation. On untreated copper, it will turn from a bright copper to a dull brown and then to a green patina.

I sounds like your problem has more to do with the original installation of the "trough". Perhaps it was not sloped enough and let water work back up under the slate tiles. Or possibly the copper valleys were not break-formed correctly.

It is always good practice to install a "peel-and-stick" rubberized membrane down below valleys and built-in gutters. This will provide a secondary protection if water works it's way over the valleys.

The solution you will get will depend upon whom you talk with and what materials and products he is used to working with.

You can get an unbiased recommendation from a good architect who has experience with historic rennovations in your area.
 
 

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