Incomplete Roof Job


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Old 10-19-05, 07:10 PM
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Incomplete Roof Job

4 months ago I had my roof redone by a professional roofer, and it still leaks!

The roofer recently examined the new roof and attic to see where water is infiltrating. They noticed water was infiltrating though the aluminum capping over the joining wall between my home and my neighbor's home.

The joining wall is approximately 18" above the roof's top, 16" wide and 32' long. I requested several times during installation that the aluminum on the joining wall be removed and examined for any rotten wood, infiltration etc. They said it was unnecessary to remove that section and reassured me it won't leak.

Now the roofing company refuses to do any work to replace the rotten wood around the joining wall and they refuse to fix the aluminum to prevent any more infiltration into my home. The roofing company also suggested that I hire a tin smith to fix this problem.

Is the roofing company responsible for changing shingles as well as fixing the aluminum sides and capping ?
 
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Old 10-19-05, 07:25 PM
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A digital picture might help us picture the wall/roof/cap a little better. It sounds to me like this aluminum cap is atop a wall... the wall extends above both roof lines, both yours and your adjoining neighbors, and it probably has siding of some sort on it. The roofer likely roofed up to this wall, flashed his shingles to the wall, but feels he isn't responsible for anything above that... namely, your aluminum cap. Is this a correct assessment of the situation?
 
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Old 10-19-05, 07:46 PM
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XSleeper,

You are correct on all counts, the wall extends above both roof lines and the aluminum cap is atop of a wall. The roofer did work up to this joining wall and flashed his shingles there.

Is he responsible for the cap on this wall ?

PS: sorry I have no photos of the roof.
 
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Old 10-19-05, 08:06 PM
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Normally, i think the answer would be "no". Roofers usually apply shingles, and flash under existing or new counterflashings. Your siding and building paper would be considered the counterflashing that he would flash his roof to.

Unless it's specifically mentioned in your contract, I think that you probably need to find someone else... or pay him an additional amount if you'd like him to replace / repair the cap.

The problem contractors often run into when they start doing additional things is: where does my job end and someone else's start? If the "wall" was 6" tall, and the cap was right there, then I'd say "yes", since his flashings would be going directly under this cap, the cap would be considered as his responsibility, since it would clearly be a roof counterflashing. But when the wall is far enough from the roof that there is siding between the shingles and the cap... well, then the roofer thinks it's the siding guy's job. Picture for a minute that the wall is 12' above the roof- would it be the roofer's job to fix it? (that's probably how he sees it, even though it's only 16" or so away.)

He probably just doesn't want to do the work for free, and doesn't want you to think that it is included in with the roof bid.

If this were some sort of flat roof, with a parapet cap flashing, then yes.. the cap probably would be part of the roofing job, but mainly that's because the cap is often an integral part of the roof system.

What kind of siding is on that wall? Vinyl? Fiber cement?
 
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Old 10-20-05, 05:22 PM
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Here is a little twist to the story.

While the roofer was quoting the job and working out some details. I told the contractor, that the roof is rather new around 5-6 years old and perhaps it was poorly done. The previous owners of my home, had the roof done by a company that went belly-up. Hence, no guarantee. The new roofer said a new roof will fix any infiltration. Taking his word, I hired him for the job.

With the new roof I am experiencing the same as with the old roof. Infiltration along the joining wall.

Did he sell me a roof I didn't need ?

Should the roofer have investigated before starting the job, why is a new roof is leaking ?

In retrospect, it should have hired a person who does siding and not a roofer, to fix my leaky roof. Next time I have car problems, should I bring my car to the dentist ?

What is the best thing to do now ?
 
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Old 10-20-05, 05:47 PM
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ripped off,

I have been reading this and am wondering about several things.

What does your Contract say? Is there one at all?

How did you come to acquire this roofer?

Would your insurance cover such repairs? Have you called your agent?

Does it say Cost Plus? Meaning we will do this for this price but other items will be extra at whatever rate or total cost (M & L) to do what is found?

Were there any allowances given? i.e. Additional flashing beyond the stated scope of the job, siding removal and replacement, wood replacement?

If new flashing was required, the roofer could have called in subcontractors (siding) people to do what is necessary. This is as long as the CONTRACT states such and it will cost more. I would think a competent roofer would anticipate a need but issues like wood rot, things one does not see, will be extra when a problem is encountered.

If you have declined to pay more, then the roofer will not do more.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 06:57 PM
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Hi Doug,

When the estimator gave me the quote/contract. I assumed it was for a complete roofing job, to fix all the leaks. The estimator detailed all the work that was going to be done. He said verbally, the siding will be removed, this was not done by the roofer. Verbal, its not on the contract.

I got the number in the yellow pages and a friend is satisfied with their work. They are a large company that does different types of home renovations. But this roofer doesn't do siding.

I haven't checked with my insurance agent, but I will. That is a good idea.

Cost plus, Yes, I agreed to pay extra to replace any rotten wood. Their was no allowance requested by the company, one price will fix my roof. I didn't bargain the price down. I didn't want the roofer to cut corners.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 07:08 PM
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Ok, I now understand.

It's a issue of what was said versus what was written.

Time to rethink what you are going to do.

I'm sure that this can be resolved to your satisfaction.
 
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Old 10-20-05, 08:17 PM
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I hate to jump into this thing so late at night and I am tired on top of this, but what you have here are two different problems or two different areas. You have a roof, and you have a common wall. The roofer does roofs. Others do common walls. Your roofer put on a new roof as you wanted. You ASSUMED that it was your roof that was leaking, where in fact it was your common wall. The roofer would not know any better. If you wanted you wall fixed, you would have told him. But you said you wanted a new roof. So he gave you one. At this point, the roofer is done and out of the picture.
Now you are dealing with a leak in a common wall. Not a roofer porblem. When your dealing with a common wall, you are dealing with 2 different owners. If in fact the cap in leaking which it probably is, it is not a roof problem. It is a wall problem. So you not only need to contact someone to repair your common wall, but you must now deal with your neighbor. Remember have the wall is his. Now, the roofer may have said something verbally, but that does not count, nor would it stand up in court. Only the written contract is legal. Maybe the roofer should have taken it upon himself to hire someone to fix the wall. but if he had, you would not have wanted to pay more. Also, the roofer had no idea the wall leaked, and neither did you.
So my advice to you would be to get the leak fixed before you have more water damage in your home. Leave the roofer alone, he has done his job. Now its time for you to hire someone to finish your overall project. Have a good day.
 
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Old 10-22-05, 04:53 AM
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Thanks for a the advise. It has helped me understand my mistake.
 
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Old 10-22-05, 05:36 AM
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Your very welcome. After re-reading my thread, I can see that I was tired. Look at all the spelling mistakes. One would never know that I was once our State Spelling Champion in my younger days. Have a good day.
 
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Old 12-20-05, 08:01 AM
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I would not contact your homeowners insurance company. This is a home repair issue or contractor, not some sort of storm or fire or other insurance situation.
 
 

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