Too Late in the Year for New Roof?


  #1  
Old 11-14-05, 01:46 PM
T2700
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Too Late in the Year for New Roof?

Hello from Baltimore, MD.

I've got a contract in for a re-roof and gutter job. Things seem to be dragging a bit and I'm wondering if it's really too late in the year for the shingles to seal correctly. We'll be lucky to get out of the 50's again until the spring. I'm in no real hurry and it would suit me fine to wait.

Thanks in advance.
 
  #2  
Old 11-14-05, 07:07 PM
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If you have a half way reliable contractor, he should not have a problem waiting until spring to do the job, as long as you guarantee he will get it. This happens all the time. Usually it is the contractor who suggests they wait until spring. No on the other hand, it is really not to late to shingle. We are doing it every day, with temps below 50 degrees. Have a good day.
 
  #3  
Old 11-15-05, 05:08 PM
Lowongas
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I don't reccomend a recover in the cold because the nails from a nailgun tend to blow through the shingle. If the roof is torn off and you are laying shingle on a solid flat surface you can do the job in colder weather.
 
  #4  
Old 11-15-05, 05:29 PM
dougger
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I roof year round in Minnesota! This year has been busier than every so I will do some tear offs over the winter months. As long as you have your air pressure set accordingly you will not blow through the shingles with the nail guns.

When one of my builders call me in next five months with a roof that is ready for shingles I'm not going to tell them see you when it's warm!!!

In all reality as of this moment I've got a new 17sq 10/12 garage sitting, a 35sq 6/12 home, and a 40sq 7/12 home, all needing to be done ASAP... If I don't do them somebody else will and I may loose a builder.

The biggest downside to winter roofing is short days, frost in the mornings, snow and or ice on the roofs, firing up the gas powered air compressor, keeping the air lines un-froze, and finding helpers that want to work outside.
 
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Old 11-15-05, 06:15 PM
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Dougger:

You are correct. I am right next door to you, and we are going full bore at this time. In fact I have to come to MPLS and do 4 roofs on new const. I am supposed to start in Dec. Have a good day. For you readers, today it was 31 degrees with 45 mph winds all day and we did not stop working.
 
  #6  
Old 11-15-05, 08:13 PM
dougger
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Originally Posted by Jack the Contractor
Dougger:

You are correct. I am right next door to you, and we are going full bore at this time. In fact I have to come to MPLS and do 4 roofs on new const. I am supposed to start in Dec. Have a good day. For you readers, today it was 31 degrees with 45 mph winds all day and we did not stop working.
Wow, 45 mph wind and working on a roof I admire you!!! After learning of the 27 year old framer working on a new building in Prior Lake, MN dieing recently due to the wind I've decided to cool it on the "windy days".

For the past five or so years I've learned that the fall/early winter are the busiest time of the year. Extra load of new roofs and too many tear offs to keep up with...
 
  #7  
Old 12-20-05, 07:02 AM
I
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I live in Baltimore and am looking for a new roof for my city rowhouse. All the contractors tell me that it just has to be above freezing (not really much of a problem around here, even in most winters).
 
 

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