california ranch, again...


  #1  
Old 12-19-05, 05:20 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: allen park, mi
Posts: 184
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
california ranch, again...

That is what they call my house in Michigan (why put one in MI???) Anyway, built in 50's and has vaulted ceilings throughout. I assume that there is basically zero insullation in ceiling and walls. I also get big icicles on edges of roof. What can I do??? I thought about replacing roof next year (still in decent condition) and pull up sheeting to lay down insulation in roof. I just noticed on my carport which has a brick column for support that ice appears to have gotten through roof and back to the otherside of bricka and made a wall of ice. I DO NOT want this to happen in the house. Very worried Thanks for all the help.
 
  #2  
Old 12-19-05, 07:48 AM
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 5,650
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
california ranch, again...

Do you have scissor trusses (different slope outsude than inside) or do you have a roof that spans from the wall to the peak? Depending on the type, you have different options.

You can apply rigid extruded polystyrene to the ceiling of your house. I am doing it to my vaulted ceilings (scissor trusses) since my townhouse does not permit exterior modifications and I do not have good enough access for insulation above the ceiling. This can be done without removing the sheet rock, or the sheet rock can be removed. If you remove the sheetrock, you can add insulation beteween the joists or trusses. You must provide for soffit and peak vetilation in all cases.

If you are going to try to add insulation to the roof, you have a totally different type of system and you would have to have a great deal of insulation on top of the roof and will run the risk of still have ice build-up. It will make a difference if you are "flatlander" from Michigan or have to put up with some lake effect snow.

Why to try calling an insulation contractor. In addition to give you a price, he will also be giving you information or options on what you can do yourself.

Dick
 
  #3  
Old 12-19-05, 11:37 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: allen park, mi
Posts: 184
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
...

Roof goes from wall to peak. I am from suburb of Detroit so no lake effect. I think I will call an insulation/roofing contractor and talk it over. Thanks for your help. I just dont want any of this water/ice coming inside walls.
 
  #4  
Old 12-19-05, 03:54 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: allen park, mi
Posts: 184
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
just thinking...

There is a lot of ice at the bottom of the roofline on the carport. There is no heat in this area to warm the roof and melt the snow so insulation shouldn't be a problem?! hmm
 
  #5  
Old 12-22-05, 02:39 PM
Lowongas
Visiting Guest
Posts: n/a
I'm a roofing contractor in the Detriot area.
If you can't insulate properly you could go with a rubber roof.
Not pretty but effective.
In your situation I have laid 2" insulatoin board on the roof and then shingled over it.I don't beleive it was enough.
 
  #6  
Old 12-22-05, 03:54 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,204
Received 1,948 Upvotes on 1,748 Posts
Ice dams usually are the worst over exterior walls that are not insulated. Since it was built in the 50's, I'd be willing to bet that it's got substandard attic insulation. By today's standards, the space between your rafters (above the top plate of the wall and up to the roof sheathing) should have a styrofoam proper vent, with fiberglass insulation stuffed underneath the proper vent to keep heat from rising off the top plate and melting snow on your roof.

I would just guess that a combination of adding proper vents and adding more insulation to the attic would help solve your problem. If your roof is only made of rafters (same pitch inside as outside) then you have a problem, because you can only add so much insulation in there while still allowing an air space over the top. Those types of roofs are notorious for ice problems and the only viable solution I know of is to add as much insulation to the roof as possible, then add additional roof framing and sheathing on top of the existing roof, ensuring that this new roof has adequate cold air ventilation. Sometimes this is done in conjunction with continuous ventilation along the roof edge to ensure a cold roof.

The carport ice might be coming from water backing up at your ice dam (3 or 4' up the roof from the gutter) causing water to backup underneath the shingles and creating a roof leak at that spot.

A cheap solution might be getting some of those heat cables that zig-zag back and forth along the area that is prone to ice dam. Keeping the ice dam from forming should really be your goal, and that might be the simplest way to do it. If it's impossible to add enough insulation to the roof to keep it from icing, it might be your only viable choice.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: