Lifted Shingle Problem -- From New Home owner....


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Old 12-20-05, 05:21 PM
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Lifted Shingle Problem -- From New Home owner....

Hi,

I am a "first-time Home Owner" who just bough my 1st house 2 wks ago, so
please excuse my ignorance if this question is too naive...

The roof (shingles) of my house was replaced 6 months ago due to the
hail damage. Yesterday I noticed that one of the shingles is kinda lifted up
from the roof surface. (as you can see from the below link.)

Does this kind of problem post a "reliability issue" in the future in terms of
possible leak or it is just a cosmetic issue.

http://img2.uploadimages.net/show.php?img=8915531.JPG

Thanks everyone and Happy Holidays!

Raymond
 
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Old 12-20-05, 11:37 PM
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Hi Raymond,

Shingles that are lifted like the ones showing in your picture are unlikely to cause leaks, but they are much more susceptible to damage from wind - especially the ridge and hip caps.

You said that the job was done about six months ago, so that would be sometime in June? If so, it seems that during the summer, all of the shingles should have sealed, but I'm still seeing many that do not appear to have sealed at all.

Which leads me to my next observation: the shingles appear spaced correctly, but seem to be laying in a very uneven manner. So, I need to ask a few questions:

1. was the new roof put on over the old shingles, or were the old shingles taken completely off prior to the installation of the new roof?
2. If they were installed over old shingles, how many layers of old shingles are there under the new ones?
3. How far apart are the roof rafters spaced, and how thick is the decking?
2. what grade of shingle was installed? Are these 50-year architectural shingles? 40-year? 30-year?

I'm asking these things because of the uneven appearance of the roofing. If the decking of the roof itself is warped, or if you lay new shingles over old ones, the "waviness" seen on your roof can make it difficult for the new shingles to fit snuggly against the roof, making it difficult for them to seal properly. This is especially true if you installed a 40 or 50 year architectural shingle. These types of shingles are very thick and thus rigid, and may have more trouble conforming to the contours of a warped underlayment. This in turn effects their ability to seal properly. The potential problems are exacerbated by wide rafter spacing and/or decking that is too thin.

As an FYI - code in most areas does not allow more than a total of three layers of shingles - including the top layer. The primary reason for this is to prevent roofs from warping or even caving in from the total weight (dead weight plus any load from snow, ice, and wind).

Hope this helps - Merry Christmas!

Rick
 
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Old 12-21-05, 08:16 PM
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Hi Rick,

Thanks so much for your reply. It really helps clarify lots of my concerns.

This roof has a long story.... It was replaced in June as I mentioned with
old shingles completely taken off. But right before the previous owner sold
the house to me in Nov., my inspector found the unevenness of roof surface
due to some of the warped roof decks. So the owner asked the roofing
company to peel off some shingles and replace the warped decks. The hip
caps was part of the portion that was re-done at that time.

So since this work was done past summer time, do you think it would take
longer time for the shingles (I don't know if it's 40 yrs or 50 yrs) to conform
and seal. Maybe I have to wait until next summer to see all the shingles
completely seal?

Thanks again and Merry X'mas to you too.

Raymond
 
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Old 12-21-05, 10:25 PM
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Hi Raymond,

Yes, a November installation could explain why some of the shingles have not sealed yet. It is good to hear that the old shingles were removed prior to the installation of the new ones.

I don't know what the roofing codes are in your neck of the woods, but here in Washington State most local codes require that roofing contractors manually seal asphalt shingles when installing them during seasonal conditions when average temperatures range at or below 50 degrees F. Otherwise, they are susceptible to wind and ice damage.

This requirement has a legal and liability aspect as well that may interest you. Many insurance companies require manual sealing of roofs under certain weather conditions in order to assume liability for damage under a home owner policy. If you sustain damage, an adjuster may deny the claim if he/she believes the roof was not properly installed. Your only recourse at that point would be to convince the seller to assume liability by going after the roofer - all of which is unlikely to work out favorably for you.

If at all possible, see if the roofer is willing to come out and seal the shingles that are unsealed before too much longer. Especially any ridge and hip caps, or any unsealed shingles that are on the portions of your roof that tend to face into the wind. If he's willing to do this it could save you trouble down the road. The rest will seal properly in spring, once temperatures average above 50 degrees F.

Best wishes to you and yours!

Rick
 
 

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