Roof Ventilation in a Wartime Home


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Old 01-03-06, 01:16 AM
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Roof Ventilation in a Wartime Home

We are buying a wartime home and the insulation needs to be replaced in the cubby holes. (not really attic space) We also wanted to put more ventilation hoods in. We think we may have to tear down the ceiling of the bedrooms because we can't get to the peak of the roof through the cubby holes. Is this correct or is there a better way to do this?

Any info would be appreciated.
 
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Old 01-03-06, 10:56 AM
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I'm not sure what "cubby holes" are exactly in reference to a roof. From your note I am assuming you want to provide additional ventilation for the "attic" space?

If so, roof vents can be installed from the roof. You could also install a ridge vent, but then you would need additional ridge cap shingles. This may be difficult depending on the age and color of your shingles.
 
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Old 01-05-06, 05:26 PM
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If those ventilation hoods you are talking about are to air space between roofboard and insulation, I have in the past pushed 2, 2x4 s on flat up the space and then turned them to create air flow. Only if you can't get the proper product through the space.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 11:22 AM
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In western Canada, a wartime house is a smallish one and a half story, which would have what are called kneewalls on the second floor to accomodate the floor space reduction due to the slope of the roof. If this is the style of house you are talking about, I presume what you call the cubbyhole is the space behind this kneewall. So what you have on the second floor is a kneewall on each side with a short sloped roof at the top of this and another flat roof across. If this is the structure you have, look in the threads on "attics" and/or "insulation" for how to insulate a kneewall. There are basically two ways to do it. 1) insulate the sloped ceiling of the cubyhole or 2) insulate the floor and inside wall (ack of the kneewall) of the cubbyhole. In any case, you will also want to check the insulation behind the sloped part of the ceiling and in the floor of the small "attic" space at the very top. Each section is insulated in a slightly different manner. Be sure, as advised above, to leave space for air to travel from the eaves up to the top attic space. Otherwise you will get condensation.
 
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Old 01-12-06, 11:30 AM
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further to my previous response, their are various ways to vent the roof. Concensus seems to be that the best is to have ventilation for air to enter the bootom of the roof structure in the soffits and then complimentary ventilation for the air to leave the attic space at the top. Check if there is some kind of venting in the soffits (usually a series of screened round holes) as I don't believe it was common practice to put such vents in wartime houses. You might achieve more by cutting soffit vents than by adding additional "vent hoods" higher in the roof. The idea is to have fresh air moving through the roof structure. As noted above, you also need to have a path for the air to travel between the soffit vents and the higher vents, so you need to use baffles (spacers between the insulation and roof decking) in any sloped part of the roof which is insulated.

Hope this has not confused things even more.
 
 

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