Re-roofing LEAKING DORMER


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Old 05-02-06, 06:59 AM
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Re-roofing LEAKING DORMER

Hi Everyone,

Need a little advice on re-shingling a dormer. I have never done any sort of roofing and am just starting to learn the basics and would rather try and do this myself. We came home to find a leak where the main roof meets the dormer in January. I temporarily patched the area where the leak was occuring...problem looks to be that water is left standing at the roof/dormer joint because of little "depressions" at this area.

The house was built in 1912, and has the older style of wood plank sheathing under the shingles. I live in London, Ontario, Canada.

Starting 3 rows(?) above the roof/dormer joint, I was planning on:

Removing all shingles, applying ice/water shield (as there is none now), then add drip-edge to the sides (no drip-edge now either), then shingle...

Does this sound right so far?

Should I try and build up the pitch of the roof or build up the the joint where these little depressions are before I lay the ice/water shield? Not sure if there is a metal valley underneath the shingles now...should there be one?


Thanks for any advice and patience with my inexperience guys,

Paul


PICS (Before and after patching)...


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  #2  
Old 05-02-06, 05:43 PM
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It sounds like you have some good ideas.

Cover the entire dormer with the ice and water shield, starting from the lowest point and working up. lap this up onto the steeper slope, no metal is needed. The ice and water shield will need a nice clean surface to adhere to, so you might think about sheeting over the dormer with some 3/8" OSB if it currently has shiplap sheathing too.

I would also suggest that you NOT use 3 tab shingles, because you have such a low slope that each of those tabs increases you leak potential. Going with a laminated shingle that has no tabs will provide a little better protection. On low slopes, follow the instructions on your package of shingles- it will specify that each row must be sealed with roofing adhesive.

When you shingle the steep slope above the dormer, ensure that the bottom edge of the row of shingles just above the dormer does NOT curl onto the dormer. You will have to adjust your rows as you come up the rest of the roof so that once you get to that row, they will clear the dormer without curling onto the dormer.

I'm sure some professional roofers will also chime in with their opinions.
 
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Old 05-03-06, 07:32 AM
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Few more questions...

Thanks for the response XSleeper,

Just a few more questions if I could....

When I do it, I will go over it with OSB. It is quite a large surface so I will probably need more than 1 piece of OSB. Would I install the pieces one on top of the other or is it better to install them side by side?

And I am assuming I can buy the fiberglass shingles you mention at Home Depot or a local building store? Just wondering though if I'll have any problem matching my existing shingles...

Finally, you said not to curl the last row of shingles onto the dormer... is that the way it is currently (in above pic) ?
You suggested adjusting my rows before to avoid this problem..Would it be better to lay out the right pattern before installing them or start to adjust slightly the last few rows before shingling the dormer/roof joint?

Sorry for the beginner and perhaps confusing questions,

You guys are great!!

Paul
 
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Old 05-03-06, 06:40 PM
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The sheets would be laid perpendicular to the rafters, so I guess if it took 2 sheets, yes they would be stacked one on top of the other, not side by side.

Yes, they will have those shingles- they are a little pricier than 3 tabs. $60 sq as opposed to $40 sq, for example.

In your picture, some of the shingles that are on the steeper slope look like they are curling onto the flatter slope a little bit. That's bad because they will never seal down that way. When you go to shingle the lower slope, you want the top dormer row of shingles to bend up onto the steeper slope. It would be nice if that row had a 4 to 5" exposure, meaning 7-8" of that course would be bent up onto the steeper slope. Then the course of shingles that runs across the steeper slope (the first row above the dormer) needs to be kept high enough that the bottom edge does not curl out at all- you want it to lay FLAT with the slope of the higher pitched roof.

It wasn't clear to me if you would be reshingling the entire roof or not. If you are only trying to patch this in so that it doesn't leak, you'll probably want to get some 3 tabs that match the rest of the roof, since you can see them from the street. (only airplanes can see the top of your dormer). So if those 3 tabs want to curl out onto the low slope, I'd advise that you cut the tabs short, rather than let them curl.
 
 

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