metal roof jacks

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Old 09-27-06, 02:40 PM
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metal roof jacks

I am going to be sealing up a metal roof from bats. I need to be mobile on the roof, but it is slippery and has a big pitch. They have these clear foot pedestals (brackets) that look as if you can walk on them, but I would need more of them to do what I am doing. Where can I find these roof jacks for metal roof? Also, what else can I do to get around better and safer? Thanks, Rick
 
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Old 09-27-06, 03:07 PM
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Wink

Your safety belt on. and a line over the ridge. tied off.

ED
 
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Old 09-27-06, 05:38 PM
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Safety

And no slack in the safety line. Be safe! Good luck.
 
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Old 09-28-06, 07:00 AM
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I helped a friend work on a metal barn roof - he had one of those adjustable ladders (like a Little Giant) that pivots and extends in 4 sections. We hooked one section over the ridge, with the other 3 sections laying flat against the roof. That allowed us to work up and down the roof working on either side of the ladder - we relocated the ladder to move laterally.
And we used SAFETY LINES!

Ours was a galvanized roof so it wasn't a problem, but on a nice colored steel roof, you would have to be careful the ladder didn't scratch it.
 
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Old 01-05-10, 09:24 AM
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bat proofing metal roof

I have been battling it out with the bats in my corrugated metal roof for everal years nows, chasing them from one area to the next. I am renovating an old church with a monster steel roof, the peak of which is about 4 stories off the ground and the pitch is about 55 degrees max (slopes). Just to get onthe roof, you need a 30 foot ladder. In order to get all over it easily, I toss a pilot line over the peak that's attached to 2 climbing ropes and pull the ropes over. I anchor the ropes to my jeep roll cage on the opposite side I'm working on. I use a full body harness and climbing helmet, and rig a couple of ascenders on one rope and a back up rappel device on the second (backup) rope. One of the ascenders has a foot ladder hooked to it. So I climb around and maneuver on the primary rop with asenders and foot ladder, and drop back down on the back up rope with rappel device. This set up allows you to sweep the roof in wide arches and be completely safe. When I need to move, I rappel down and move the jeep further down the street, and do it again. I carry a shoulder bag stuffed with Great Stuff foam sealeant and some screen material to back the large holes. I chase them around the roof year to year, as they discover holes and I find them and seal them up, but I'm not sure how else to approach it. Anyway, hope this helps - whatver you do, use a safety line and preferably a rappel device or something with it so you can keep it somewhat tight and actually get down off the roof if you fall on it the rope, instead of stuck hanging there!
 
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Old 01-05-10, 11:09 AM
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Uh, noticed the date from the OP, but do with this info what you will....he never wrote back. Hopefully he didn't walk on them...

Originally Posted by weekendwarrior0 View Post
They have these clear foot pedestals (brackets) that look as if you can walk on them, but I would need more of them to do what I am doing.
Are they installed near the edges of the roof? I suspect that they aren't "foot pedestals" at all, but snow guards. I have seen a number of them that look like what you might be describing, but they will not hold your weight in any meaningful way. Usually they are merely adhered to the roof surface. Anything that isn't screwed into the underlying wood, hopefully into a joist or, if not, by numerous heavy (#15 or more) screws, is neither OK to walk on or support yourself from a rope system.

Unless you know for sure that those are made for walking on, I would highly recommend staying off of them.
 

Last edited by moliphant; 01-05-10 at 11:11 AM. Reason: checked the date of the original post.
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