slope


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Old 03-02-07, 08:05 AM
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slope

Can someone tell me how to figure out the slope of my roof. I have roof with a slight slope. The roof that is currently on there is rolled asphalt roofing. I noticed between the seams they are sealed with roof cement. The roof is shot and needs to be replaced. I do not see any leaks so I assume this type of roof works, so I want to replace it with the same. It is a very small section just over my dining room. I heard that if I go this route it is very cheap and will cost me a few hundred dollars in material, does that sound right? Also since it is an addition the right hand side that slopes, slopes against the original part of the house (the addition is lower than the old house)How should I seal between the the roof and the old section of the house. There is vinyl siding that comes down and meets the roof. I don't know how they did it cause of the siding. I plan on removing the the siding a few feet to see what is there. I was thinking of just get alum flashing and bend it and run it along the old house and addition making a valley and sealing with cement, lay the roof then using fash cement along the seem and then reside it. Any feedback on my 1 million questions is appreciated.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 11:48 AM
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Roof

Slope is expressed as vertical distance and horizontal distance. Example: a 4/12 slope(or pitch) means the roof rises four units for each 12 units of horizontal distance. Set one end of a level on the roof surface in a level position, and measure the vertical distance from the other end down to the roof surface. The vertical distance in inches compared to the length of the level in inches is the slope. Take the measurement and post back the results. We can help you figure the slope.

Where the roof slopes into the side of the house, I would rebuild this section of roof to turn the peak if the roof at right angles to the house. This is done on a small scale behind chimneys and is called a cricket.

Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 01:14 PM
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Ok I measured and I got 4 1/2 inches. Also I am not sure I can rebuild that. I took pictures so if there is anyone familiar with this stuff let me know and I will shoot you the picture over.
 
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Old 03-02-07, 02:46 PM
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Slope

What length level did you use when you got the 4 1/2 inch vertical measuremnt?
 
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Old 03-02-07, 03:02 PM
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i used a 4ft level
 
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Old 03-04-07, 12:37 PM
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Slope

The slope is 4.5/48. Could also be expressed as 1.125/12. As previously stated, this is a very shallow slope.
 
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Old 03-04-07, 02:31 PM
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Thanks a million, just out of curiostity, what is the formula you used to figure that out? I realized I made an error, it is 5.5 inches per 48 inch level. Also the front portion of the addition as well as the my front porch is about 8 inches per a 48 inch level. They used shingles for this part, should they not have used shingles? The roof was put on in 2000 and I was told by my inspector that it is a top of the line roof and very expensive. I assume they used shingles since it is on the front of the house and quite visible. I had one problem with one leak last fall when we had severe hurricane type weather. I went up and used flashing sealant and put it all around the shingles it was leaking from and never had a problem again. Is it safe to say that if it is 7yrs old and not leaking then I am in the safe as far them using shingles. Thanks again for all your help
 
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Old 03-04-07, 04:29 PM
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Slope

Since you used a 48 inch level, divide both numbers by 4. 5.5 divided by 4 is 1.375 . The slope is 1.375/12. (divide 48 by 4 also) The 8 in. vertical would be a 2/12 slope.

The roof pros will need to advise you on the minimum slope allowed for a shingled roof. The shingle manufacturer may possibly have this info on their website. Good luck with your project.

Check out this webite; scroll down near the bottom:

http://www.roofhelp.com/faq1.htm
 

Last edited by Wirepuller38; 03-04-07 at 04:34 PM. Reason: Added last 2 lines.
 

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