can water infiltrate regardless of pitch?


  #1  
Old 01-01-08, 03:20 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North East - New England
Posts: 69
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
can water infiltrate regardless of pitch?

Can water find its way through the roof regardless of the pitch? Every time it snows and it accumulates there and melts I get wet stains and leaking. Roof is a year and 1/2 old. nut the pitch is pretty steep ,35- 40%
 
  #2  
Old 01-02-08, 07:22 PM
tinner666's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Richmond, Va.
Posts: 157
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Short answer is 'yes'. Proper ventilation and Ice shield can alleviate, if not stop the problems, along with enough ceiling insulation to prevent warm air from hitting the roof sheathing.
 
  #3  
Old 01-02-08, 08:43 PM
M
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,011
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
For starters, is is a composition shingle roof or something else? Where is the water infiltration occurring? At the eaves? Lower end of a dormer? Around a chimney? Did you have this problem with the previous roof? Was the new roofing job a "tear-off", on installed over the existing roof?
 
  #4  
Old 01-02-08, 10:48 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 2
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Squid View Post
Can water find its way through the roof regardless of the pitch? Every time it snows and it accumulates there and melts I get wet stains and leaking. Roof is a year and 1/2 old. nut the pitch is pretty steep ,35- 40%

Yes it can. If it's leaking and was just installed last year i would call the company to have them repair it for free. Most companys will warranty their labor for a year but seeing as it's 1 yr and a 1/2 they should fix that. That roof should have a leak for at least another 15- 20 years.

Here's an article on snow loads on the roof
 
  #5  
Old 01-03-08, 07:40 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North East - New England
Posts: 69
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Michael,
I think its coming in at the lower end of a low pitch dormer, by the way they used shingles on this portion . With such a low pitch, should shingles be used in that application? I dont think so...
 
  #6  
Old 01-03-08, 08:55 AM
M
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,011
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Squid View Post
Michael,
I think its coming in at the lower end of a low pitch dormer, by the way they used shingles on this portion . With such a low pitch, should shingles be used in that application? I don't think so...
If this is the at the eave (the lower end of the roof where it would be above a gutter) there are a lot of details that could be wrong: missing or incorrect or incorrectly installed underlayerment and/or drip edge, missing/incorrect shingle stater course, missing or incorrectly installed gutters and/or fasteners, missing or obstructed soffit vents, or some combination of the above.

And if the new roof is leaking at this location, and the old one was not, it's likely that the problem or problems were created by the new install.

Worse, if the roofer could not install it right the first time, in my experience it's likely they can't fix it right, either - on inspections here in Chicago I'm constantly seeing poor quality roofing work, with "the icing the cake" being a liberal slathering of plastic roofing cement applied in an attempt to "fix" problems.

It can be very tough to get such problems corrected if the original roofer does not know how to do so, in my area I can at least recommend two roofers - one for residential shingle roofs and flashings and one for commercial work - expert at fixing other people's mistakes, but I eventually found them pretty much by luck while trying to get previous work on my own buildings repaired.

I will suggest this, though: if you see your roofer going up the ladder to "repair" a newly shingled roof with a tube of caulk or a bucket of roofing cement, my advice is bite the bullet and get someone else to do the work.
 
  #7  
Old 01-03-08, 09:10 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: North East - New England
Posts: 69
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks Michael
The Roof is still under warranty and if the company chooses not to reroof as I believe is the only and correct option then I will move foward and get a public adjuster to make claims against them for the celing damage inside the house and to and to reroof the shed dormer with the proper material. In MASS public appraisers for this kindof damage do a great job for homeowners in these kinds of situations if the company responsible doesnt do right by the customer. Thank fully I have the Insurance binder and contract of the roofing company.
 
  #8  
Old 01-03-08, 01:02 PM
M
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,011
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Squid View Post
Thanks Michael
The Roof is still under warranty and if the company chooses not to reroof as I believe is the only and correct option then I will move forward and get a public adjuster to make claims against them for the ceiling damage inside the house and to and to reroof the shed dormer with the proper material. In MASS public appraisers for this kind of damage do a great job for homeowners in these kinds of situations if the company responsible doesn't do right by the customer. Thank fully I have the Insurance binder and contract of the roofing company.
The problem is, do they know how to do it right?

I don't want to keep harping on this, but in the majority of the cases where I see such problems, the install is wrong because the roofers have ignored the instructions printed on every bundle of shingles - literally thousands of them - they have schlepped up the ladder six inches for their noses for years.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: