New roof questions...


  #1  
Old 03-06-08, 10:33 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 39
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
New roof questions...

I had planned on getting vinyl soffit, metal wrapped fascia and new gutters for my house, but the more I got to looking at things I think an entire new roof would be better (sheathing, felt, 30 year dimensionals, etc).

Let me explain. The house is about 45 years old with the original 3/8" spongy, sagging plywood sheathing. The 4 year old 3 tab shingles look awful because of all the sagging which I am guessing is a result of the thin sheathing.

Am I insane for considering having all this done? There are currently no leaks, but I plan to be here a while and adding new gutters, fascia, etc seems like putting lipstick on a pig.

I figure I can get all this done at once an not have to worry for at least the next 20 years.

Opinions appreciated.
 
  #2  
Old 03-07-08, 02:09 AM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,126
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'm guessing your rafters are 24" center, maybe 2x4 and not all straight either. Then 3/8" would sag indeed.

5/8" tongue & groove sheathing could go on top of the old 3/8", after stripping off the old shingles of course. This will flatten the roof a good deal without adding framing. It is relatively inexpensive, and, if you're going to have guys up on the roof anyway, it takes little time. Like, a day to put all the sheathing on.

I suggest you have the fascia put on just before the new shingles. A drip-edge flashing goes atop that (should) and roofers will want to nail it down into the fascia.
 
  #3  
Old 03-07-08, 11:42 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,394
Received 63 Upvotes on 55 Posts
New Roof

I would tear off the old sheathing for two reasons:

This gives an opportunity to inspect the rafters/trusses and make any necessary repairs.

Also provides a better chance to get the nails for the sheathing into the rafters. Do you live in a high wind area? If so, glueing in addition to nailing may be necessary.
 
  #4  
Old 03-07-08, 12:21 PM
K
Member
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Vancouver, Canada
Posts: 1,126
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Good question: Where do you live? If your roof must take heavy snow loads then just adding sheathing to (probably) underbuilt framing doesn't help where needed.
 
  #5  
Old 03-07-08, 11:11 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 39
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I live in northern Georgia. We get some high winds once in a while, but nothing big.

I think I am going to go ahead and get the work done. Thanks for the opinions.
 
  #6  
Old 03-07-08, 11:35 PM
Ed Imeduc's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Mountain Williams Missouri
Posts: 17,505
Upvotes: 0
Received 1 Upvote on 1 Post
Wink

If you are going to stay in the home for a time . Id say for sure go for it all.. Dont forget about the vents in the over hang and up at the ridge . Might put the foam vents in the rafter space there over the insulation. That way you could put more insulation in later iof you want. Make sure they put a metal drip edge on it . Also use the full lenth gutters if you can there. That way no seams in them.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: