single-handed roofing possible?


  #1  
Old 06-05-08, 04:40 PM
C
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Question single-handed roofing possible?

I've done asphalt shingles strip/repair deck/reshingle (not my profession believe me) up north but i want to replace my shingles down here in miami.

I may actually go with metal - but that's another thread.

My question is has anyone had practical experience tarping an ENTIRE (okay just one "plane" at a time ) roof between stripping/deck repair and repapering? What did you use to secure the tarps? and where and how? weights? ground stakes? ???

Is this a stupid idea?

I think it's quite doable if the tarps are done properly.

Any suggestions? (besides getting someone to help me)

thanks in advance

Mike
 
  #2  
Old 06-08-08, 08:34 PM
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Mike, if you own the home you can apply for a owner builder permit with Miami Dade County. You as an owner are still subject to the same building codes and inspections as a roofing contractor. Installation and building codes are much different than up north, even shingle roofs. Get a copy of the current high velocity hurricane installation procedures and inspection schedule. Also talk to a building inspector at the local building department. Roofing in Miami in is a tall order.
 
  #3  
Old 06-09-08, 12:14 PM
T
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I'm still redoing my roof, single-handedly. Luckily, I'm in a place where it seldom rains, so the fact that it's going to take me around seven months doesn't appear to be a big problem. (And, I should note that it'll probably end-up that I've worked on it every other weekend and for only a couple of hours most workdays, plus I decided to replace the "bad" portions of my roof planking (which required me to rip new boards to match the old), so my 7-month timeframe shouldn't necessarily be taken as any kind of guideline)

Anyway...

In the beginning, I started by stapling-down the thickest plastic that I could find at my local hardware stores, but wind is a factor here in the desert, as I'm sure it is in Miami and bare staples didn't really do the trick.

Then, I switched to stapling (1/2" staples) through old pieces of felt and old shingles. This held-up to the wind much better, but I found that in some places, it'd get up under the spaces between my staples. So, I bought a handful of 1" x 2" furring strips and in the places really susceptible to the predicted wind, I'd spot nail (3 or 4 nails per 8') at the "head" of the plastic.

Because I probably stripped-off too many shingles to start, (My roof has numerous offsets, so the idea was that I could work in some places while the wife was available to watch the kids and in others, when I'd be needed to go up and down the ladder.) I found that if I tried to cover and uncover everything with each predicted rain, it'd take me about two hours of fighting the wind to get everything covered and about half an hour to re-prepare my work area. Now, I pretty much only use the furring strips (for an almost continuous seam) and if I know that I won't be working someplace for a few days or another couple of weeks, I just leave the plastic over that portion.

I don't know the dimensions and configurations of your house, but I thought tarps were too expensive to do mine, so I just went with the really thick plastic. It wasn't cheap and the fact that it's only in 10' strips adds to the "seams", but it still came out cheaper than using tarps. Though, of course, I'm also in place where we'll go months without any measurable rain and exposure to the wind requires me to visibly check any "left-down" plastic on a fairy regular basis.

BTW: Once you get something covered in felt, you should be good to go.

Hope this helps...


PS) You might also want to take the hurricane season into consideration, when you're deciding to actually start and how much you should take off at one time.
 
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Old 06-12-08, 10:04 PM
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Well, I can feel for you. I live in Ft Lauderdale. There are very strict codes here and in Dade county. Also, we are entering the summer rain season.



Just be very careful that all work is up to code. If you go to sell it you don't want to end up having to put a new roof on.

Tom
 

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  #5  
Old 06-14-08, 11:12 AM
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thanks

thank you all, for your input - i will definitely consider all this info and act on it.

Regards

Mike
 
 

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