Rainoff overshootiing inside corner of gutter


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Old 09-23-08, 10:18 AM
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Rainoff overshootiing inside corner of gutter

I have a 6' fiberglass deck covering connected directly to the roof, so the gutters are on the outside of that covering. So, I have a long valley from the top of the roof connecting the garage & house clear to the end of the deck covering. During heavy (sometimes not so heavy) rain, the water completely overshoots the gutter & hits the flower beds below. It is making a huge mess & hole in the flower bed, splashing up onto the deck. I live in Oregon so we have a bit of rain. I'm not sure how to solve this...I have tried to figure out a way to extend the outer edge of the gutter in just that section to possibly catch at least the heavy overshooting, but then I trap all the leaves & trash from the oak trees behind the extension & causing a worse clogging problem than I already have. Any ideas? They are installed as high as they can be under the fiberglass deck cover.
 
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Old 09-23-08, 10:58 AM
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I have the same problem at my rental. The gutters and downspouts are simply to small to carry the amount of runoff. When I complained to the landlord, he said to fill the flowerbed with gravel. The condo unit is in a row of a dozen or more units. All fenced patios abutt on a grade. The runoff on the grade crosses all patios and also washes through the flower bed and across the patio. I painted the fence and landscaped the beds in early spring, but I gave up. The flower bed has a hole in it and washed out the soil and plants. I will ponder a new strategy for next spring.
 
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Old 09-23-08, 04:34 PM
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If i understand it correctly, it sounds like you need to put in a piece of flashing on the top of the eavestrough.

First you need an L shaped piece of aluminum, at least 16 inches long. Ideally you could get it from the same guys who did your eavestrough.
Have side on the back of the L match the color of your current trough

(this side) -> L

It should be around 4 inches tall, with a 3/4" - 1" lip

Make a small cut in the lip in the center, allowing you to bend it to the shape of the inside corner, color facing out.

Now fasten this on to the top of the outside lip on your corner with short (1/2") screws.

Now when water comes rushing down the valley, it gets diverted to the eavestrough on either side.

Hope this made sense. If i don't have it right a picture might be helpful
 
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Old 09-25-08, 08:39 PM
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Thanx so much for the help...I'm headed off to the hardware store tomorrow to get some aluminum flashing. I have vinyl gutters, but there isn't any reason why I can't still use the L shaped diverter idea. Worth a try.
 
 

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