Roof leaking , can't determine problem


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Old 11-19-08, 04:46 PM
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Angry Roof leaking , can't determine problem

I own a house that was built in 2001. It is a 2 story center -hall colonial. I discovered a leak (via the attic)that appears to be coming from the valley of the roof. From the attic,I can see the water penetrating through a slight gap where a metal sheathing clip is anchored.I think these clips are used by the contractors when laying roof sheathing.I cannot see any daylight coming through.I am also estimating the area of the problem from the outside. The angle of the valley is not visible from within the attic because of the framing outlay. From the roof side, all of the shingles are in good repair and do not appear to be loose.There aren't any protruding nails. I was going to use a nail (from inside the attic) to push through the roof, therefore, giving me my exact location of this leak. Do you think this would bad idea? I'm not sure if I would cause a bigger problem (ie., damage to membrane or flashing). looking for any and all suggestions.
 
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Old 11-19-08, 05:06 PM
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Yes, bad idea. It's not likely that the drip inside is the exact location that water is getting in. It could be much higher than that.

You didn't say what type of valley you have. Is it an open valley, with about 3" of metal exposed?

Or is it a partially woven valley, where the shingles on one side go up and under the other side, which is cut in a straight line up the valley?

If it's a partially woven valley, you'd want to look for a couple seams (in the valley) on consecutive rows that line up closely to one another.
 
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Old 11-24-08, 12:49 PM
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Thanks to Xsleeper for your reply. I have a partially woven valley from your description of the roof. At what point would I determine where the leak is coming from. I am not a roofer or have any roofing experience. I believe I could fix it myself with the correct guidance. If pictures would help, I have a couple I could upload. Thanks again.
 
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Old 11-24-08, 05:29 PM
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Ok, if you have a partially woven valley (where the shingles on one side of the valley all go up onto the other slope, and the shingles on that other slope are cut in a straight line at the valley) then the first thing I would do is get up on the roof, go to the general area where you suspect the leak is... and gently lift up on the shingles on the overlapping side. You don't want to pull them off of their nails- just high enough that you can look for any obvious leaks.

The shingles that are all woven up under that side ought to go up about 12", so you should NOT be able to see any felt paper or sheathing when you lift up the overlapping shingles on that side. Inexperienced or shoddy roofers may sometimes goof up a valley by simply cutting a shingle too short or by being too lazy to put in a filler so that the shingle that runs through the valley doesn't have a seam land right in the valley.

As you examine the valley, you would also examine the shingles that weave up onto the other slope and see if any of the butt joints are closer than 6" horizontally from one row to the next. If joints are too close, they can leak.

Personally, I don't like to have ANY butt joints that end closer than 6" to the valley. This ensures you don't have ANY seams that fall right in the bottom of the valley where most of the water runs. But I'm doubt that's a standard practice by roofers everywhere. But it might be another thing to look for.

If none of these help identify the leak, you could always try the hose test. Run a garden hose down the valley and starting at the lowest point let it run. Check for leaks. Move it up a couple feet and let it run. Check for leaks. Move it up a couple more feet and let it run, and so on. If nothing shows up when you run the hose down the valley then maybe the leak isn't in the valley and you need to consider other areas.

If you wanted to post a picture of the roof you could... but it should be a wide enough picture of the area that it would show both the valley and everything above the suspected leak, all the way to the ridge. That way everyone here can have a look and if they have any ideas they can help diagnose the problem.
 
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Old 11-25-08, 02:40 PM
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Thanks again. I will try your suggestions on the next dry day and get back to you.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 04:12 AM
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butt shingle edges should be no closer than 12" to the valley area,yes lower side weaves up12-18" on opposing side,overlap valley is laid so shingles ends in valley crotch,and the top half of those shingles gets cropped square so as not to lead water under the valley------1)check to see if the overlay valley is loose to where you could slide your hand under it,if not it`s nailed to close(allways 12" away)-you can also separate the tar seals on those shingles at the valley-then check the nails attaching the shingles for signs of rust which will show where the leak/s are
 
 

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