Replace missing aluminum soffit sections

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-12-09, 06:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Smile Replace missing aluminum soffit sections

Must replace aluminum soffit sections - some on second story gable roof peak. Have squirrels getting into the attic and just heard of house burning from furry rats eating electrical wiring.

Would like to personally repair to save money but may be difficult.

Fascia is wood 1x6 and would be difficult to bend back to install new soffit.

Any Ideas?

Thanks
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-12-09, 08:56 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,158
Received 196 Votes on 182 Posts
I don't know that I've ever seen aluminum soffit used in combination with wood fascia. The back of the soffit is likely held in place with an f or j-channel... but what is covering the front edge of the soffit... where it is normally stapled?

Or are you saying that the 1x6 is also covered, and that is what would be difficult to bend back? I'm having a hard time understanding exactly what you mean.

If there is already aluminum fascia cover over the wood 1x6 fascia, you need to remove it, or at least pull all the nails so that it will push away far enough to get to the soffit. In some cases, it just needs to get ripped off and replaced. You can't always reuse it.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-09, 03:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Reply XSleeper - Replace aluminum soffit sections

As I stated in my initial post, I have aluminum soffit attached to a wood fascia. There is no covering (just wood) with j-channels used. This is a common construction technique used in Florida. Please do not belittle me - I know what I am talking about!

I only need to replace one or two soffit sections without tearing the whole thing apart. I just want a simple fix!!
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-09, 06:05 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,158
Received 196 Votes on 182 Posts
I don't think I was belittling you, just asking questions trying to understand what you have. Don't be so quick to take offense. Perhaps you don't understand how difficult it is to give good advice to people without actually being able to see things with your own eyes.

If you have j-channels on both ends, you have 2 options. Cut the front j-channel and bend it down to insert your soffit, then bend it back up. -Or- Cut your soffit short enough that it fits all the way into the back j-channel, but clears the front j-channel. Once you have the piece pushed up, try and center it between the front and back j-channel. On the last piece, you may need to trim a bit of side metal off of the last piece to make it a little easier to slip in. The last piece is the hardest one to install, and sometimes it works better to try to install the last 2 pieces at the same time, curving them into place. Good luck.
 
  #5  
Old 03-15-09, 10:38 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Repair soffits

XSleeper,

First of all, my apologies. I understand you get questions that are difficult to figure out. Second, thank you for the advice - I have been looking at how my soffits are installed and the best way to fix. They did a poor job attaching the j-channels and after the 2004 hurricanes many were pushed out or blown away.

I do see there is a trick to this that may require extra work or professional help.

Again thank you for the help and please ignore my unprovoked offensiveness.
 
  #6  
Old 03-15-09, 11:59 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 23,158
Received 196 Votes on 182 Posts
No worries Steve.

One of the worst techniques I've seen when it comes to j-channel installation is that some installers use j-channel in situations where they should have used f-channel. They cut a flap in the top "nailing flange" of the j-channel by making 2 cuts, and bend the resulting square straight up, making a "tab" for them to staple the j-channel to the sheathing. Works great UNTIL you get wind. With nothing to keep the j-channel from tipping up, it just bends like a hinge and lets all the soffit blow out.

I had a friend whose house this happened on, and it always seemed to happen clear up in the peak on the 3rd story. I nearly got killed once when I was trying to work up there... not the safest place to be.

So if you try working up there, be careful!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: