Running a ground spout under the sidewalk

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Old 05-08-09, 11:20 AM
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Running a ground spout under the sidewalk

The downspout from my gutters is washing away the dirt under my sidewalk. I was told to dig under the sidewalk and put a ground spout under to have the water run on the other side.

I have two of these ground spouts, but wouldn't it just wash away at the end of them? I thought that they would have holes in them to disburse the water as it goes so that it doesn't all come out the end.
 
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Old 05-09-09, 07:20 AM
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Do you have room to install a drywell under each of the down spouts? It's not any more work than running a sleeve under the walk.
 
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Old 05-10-09, 10:49 AM
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I don't know what a drywell is.. A friend said to just dig a hole and fill it with rocks. He thought about 3 feet deep. I would want the rocks contained some how though, so I was thinking maybe one of those tubes they use for deck footings. Think that will work??
 
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Old 05-10-09, 05:58 PM
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You're close. A drywell is a plastic barrel about the size of a small garbage can. You drill holes in it, put it in the hole you did, put some gravel in the bottom of it & run the downspout into the top of it. Backfill the hole & you're done.
 
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Old 05-11-09, 10:18 AM
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That sounds way easier. I have a few other things to get at Menards, I will look into it when I go.

Thanks!
 
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Old 05-13-09, 02:54 PM
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ok, the kids at Menards had no idea what a dry well is. I explained my problem and two of them suggested a splash block. OMG!
 
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Old 05-13-09, 03:13 PM
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Is there a Home Depot or a Lowes there? If not try a building supply or stone yard.
 
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Old 05-14-09, 07:34 AM
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They are building a Lowes now, not sure when it will be done. What a pain. I will probably just make my own version of one.
 
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Old 05-14-09, 11:58 AM
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Old 05-14-09, 03:55 PM
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You can make one if you want. It should work.
 
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Old 08-02-09, 09:13 PM
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I've got a similar situation where my downspout dispenses it's water into a flower bed between the side walk and my house. Problem is, the water goes down and dampens the brick foundation, after we have a big rain. I fixed the damp brick problem by routing the water to my lawn by using some flexible corrugated drain tile above the side walk. I just want to caution you about draining it out near your home. I read the link above about dry well's and it doesn't apply to me because my soil is almost solid clay and my basement probably wasn't sealed properly.

I'm going to dig under my side walk (water jet most likely) and run 4" corrugated drain tile with slits in it (to prevent the mosquito hatchery) and then end it about 15 feet away near a tree in my yard. There is a slight grade so I should be OK.
 
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Old 08-02-09, 10:05 PM
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Running a ground spout under the sidewalk

If you have some elevation for surface drainage you can force/jet rigid PVC under the sidewalk and use pop-up fitting to allow surface drainage.

If you are in a real cold climate a northern or eastern exposure, it could be bad for freezing. If it works it is a great solution. I switch my downspout extension/drainage depending on the situation and season. My NE downspout will carry the roof melting water at -10 F, but it will freeze in the discharge line so it will freeze if unexposed to the direct sun/Mother Nature. The sun and transpiration will remove most of the ice if in the open. - Not good in the areas that have a cloudy winter.

Dick
 
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Old 08-09-09, 08:20 PM
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After doing more reading, I've decided that straight PVC is the way to go instead of corregated drain tile. I'm going to drill holes in the PVC section that doesn't sit underneath the sidewalk and lay it on a bed of pea gravel and keep it wrapped in landscape fabric. It will still end in a pop-up. This way there is less of a chance my sidewalk will heave.
 
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