Using corrugated roofing panels for gazebo

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Old 05-11-09, 02:02 PM
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Using corrugated roofing panels for gazebo

I've just framed in the joists for a four-sided hip roof (tetrahedron) on a gazebo.

It looks something like this:

The skeleton of the roof finally takes shape pictures from home & garden photos on webshots

But now the time has come to actually install the corrugated roof panels. Screwing down the panels on 3 of the 4 sides will be straight forward. However, on the fourth side I will be unable to reach the upper portions of the panels from to secure them to the joists.

When I was young, I might have tried to have the corrugated roofing panels support my weight, but I'm afraid over the years my belly has just gotten too big to be supported by some wavy plastic.

I've been searching the internet for trained roofing monkeys, but the cost is too prohibitive. Has anyone else come up with a method to solve this problem?
 
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Old 05-11-09, 02:17 PM
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Roof Panels

You will need to install purlins at right angles to the rafters to support the panels.
 
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Old 05-11-09, 02:34 PM
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Using corrugated roofing panels for gazebo

Even with purlins spaced at 24" intervals, I would think the weight of a human body (at least my body) on plastic roofing panels would end up cracking them.
 
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Old 05-11-09, 02:54 PM
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Hmmm, I'm sure a roofing guy will weigh in...but..I might do it this way.

Measure and cut the panel...set it in place, cut a purlin to fit (wth's a purlin anyway, I'd have said blocking..lol), put the purlin in place, measure and mark carefully, take the panel and purlin down, attach purlin to panel, set panel and purlin in place,then toenail or toe screw in place?

Or find a skinny helper...lol?

How do you keep the corners waterproof btw? Or is that not a concern?
 
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Old 05-11-09, 05:33 PM
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Roof

OK, GG45, you win. Blocking would probably look better for this application. BTW, this will answer your question:

Purlin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Guys, have a good day.

Ken
 
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Old 05-11-09, 05:36 PM
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LOL it wasn't a race..I seriously didn't know what a purlin was...now I get it.
 
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Old 05-11-09, 07:51 PM
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You need a sky hook.......... This is not being inspected, right?

The hip rafters should be one size up than the commons, per code.
All rafters need 1-1/2" bearing (seat cut).
Need collar ties to resist outward spread, 4' on center.

These are minimum code safety standards. Just giving you the info, take it or leave it. Be safe, G
 
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Old 05-12-09, 05:44 AM
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Roof

When I covered my deck, I used corrugated panels. I, too, did not want the panels to have to support my weight. When installing the panels, I stood up between the rafters and reached over the panel to install the screws. Panels covered 24 in. width. I used blocking between the rafters to support the panels. I suggested purlins because they are easier to install. Blocking must be cut to exact length to fit between the rafters and nailing in is somewhat of a challenge.
 
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Old 05-12-09, 08:16 AM
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Corrugated panels

The recommendations you all have given me (skyhooks etc.) seem to confirm that there is no standard (or easy) method of building a hip roof with corrugated polycarbonate panels.

There are only 2 ways I can think of securing these panels...
1) Lay a piece of plywood on top of the corrugated panels and hope that the plywood distrubtes my weight enough to keep from cracking the panels.

2) On the fourth side of the roof I could always cut the panels in short lengths and install them like shingles. However this certainly detracts from the appearance of single length panels.

Gunguy45 ... thanks for your recommendation but as you noted, the corners must be covered also. My plan is to cut lengthwise one ridge and two valleys out of a panel, and then bend this piece over the corners and screw it to the rafter.

I'll let you know how well the overlayment of plywood method works.
 
 

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