Roofing materials -Help


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Old 05-21-09, 02:01 PM
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Roofing materials -Help

Hi, I'm in the middle of having a roof replaced. But its gotten confusing not knowing which roofer I talk to is correct or just telling me things to get more money.
I'm having a 25 yrs asphalt shingle roof installed. They are removing the old layer.
I live in GA, about an hour south of Atlanta. does anyone out there know what is the norm for felt? I was told by one guy he would use 15lb felt all over and 90lb in the valleys.. Also what is the norm to be used in the valleys?
Also is using a nail gun ok, instead of hand nailing?
Is the 15lb the norm? Thanks for your help.
Catz
 
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Old 05-23-09, 06:29 AM
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Catz, 15 lb felt is the norm for the field, and 90 fine for the valleys, but I prefer metal under it. Using the nail gun is definitely a plus, as it cuts down on labor cost. He can nail one shingle in about 2 seconds, while hand nailing will take considerably longer. I am assuming, also, you are getting more than one estimate, right? Have them enumerate all that they will do and have it in writing so you can hold their feet to the fire. Inspect the job as it goes along if you wish (it's your money), and ask questions. Don't be a pest, as their time is thier money. I live in the other direction about 2 hours and am having mine done next week.
 
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Old 05-23-09, 01:52 PM
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Thumbs up Thanks

Thanks for the info, we did get 3 estimates. Went with the middle one that used 15lb felt and used ice and water membrane, which is an adhesive shield in the valleys. (which was what the high priced guy was going to use also, for much more) Of course we plan to keep an eye on them, they had good references a couple guys from my husbands work had them do their roofs and also they have done a few of the churches around here that we've seen. The guy wrote down everything and we went over it with him. But we have trusted to much before in other repair/replace situations and been burned. So now we are over cautious but plan to stay out of their way
Ours should be replaced the first week of June, unless this rain keeps setting them behind. Good luck with having yours done and thanks again for the help.
Catz
 
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Old 05-24-09, 01:46 PM
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I know, mine was supposed to have started last Monday...sunshine all week...Apparently he was behind because of all the other rain, so mine will start tomorrow....rain for the next 5 days. Go figure.
Glad you got it all ironed out. Let us know how it comes out with pictures. We love to see how projects end up.

Larry.
 
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Old 06-20-09, 08:22 AM
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I am in Chicago so my answers will vary. 15# is minimum code and we don't use it. We use 30#. We like it better, and less likely to tear and wrinkle than 15. I had 90# in the valleys on my roof on my house. I just repalced my roof which was less than 10 years old (I moved in 2 years ago). The 90# wore away.

The valleys are critical areas and should be installed with thicker, NOT thinner, material. Closed cut valleys are the method of application you'll see on most shingle wrappers. Installing the 90# *might* void the manufacturer's warranty. Check with the manufacturer. Consider an ice shield in the valley then a closed cut or woven valley in lieu of 90#.

Nail guns are ok. I started hand nailing in 1998 and have switched to gun nailing in 2004. it comes down to the character of the roofer installing the nail. While it is easier to make a mistake with a gun nailer, a good roofer who cares about quality over speed will fix those mistakes. The mistakes can be crooked nails, deep nails, or nails not deep enough. Again a good roofer will correct those problems on the fly and not cover them up.... a bad roofer just doesn't care no matter what tool using to drive the nails.

Hand nailing does not take any longer than gun nailing IF you do it every single day. I have seen hand nailers go toe-to-toe with gun nailers... Now we're talking about skilled roofers who've been hand nailing every day 5-6 days a week for years. They have muscle memory and stamina. If this is something you day once in awhile, gun nailing is definetly much faster.
 
 

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