How to Repair Nail Through Top of Asphalt Shingle


  #1  
Old 06-15-09, 08:50 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 242
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How to Repair Nail Through Top of Asphalt Shingle

What is the best way to repair a nail that was put through the top exposed area on asphalt shingle? This was a repaired area which is on a re-roof with a second course. Should I drive the nail and patch with roofing cement? Or remove the nail and redrive the nail under the shingle and patch with roofing cement? Or other method? Thanks
 
  #2  
Old 06-16-09, 01:02 AM
S
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 20,165
Received 1,165 Votes on 1,123 Posts
I think the best answer would be to replace the shingle. That said, I 'fixed' one like that on my roof with a big glob of roofing cement.
 
  #3  
Old 06-20-09, 06:56 AM
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This can be accomplished a number of ways. Replacing the shingle may be the best way, depending on the condition of the existing shingles. If you're unsure how to do this I can share step by step advice.

Another option would be to drive the nail, perhaps using a nail set and then caulk the tear in the shingle above. Use a high grade polyurethane caulk, not an acrylic or water based caulk.

However a nail pop is perhaps a symptom of a larger problem and while you're up there I suggest inspecting the entire roof. If you have one pop, you may have more. It could be possible the roofers used 1 1/4" nails instead of 1 1/2" nails which are necessary on lay-overs. You may consider removing the nail and measuring it's length.
 
  #4  
Old 06-20-09, 08:00 AM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 242
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
This area was just repaired and it looks like the nail was mistakenly driven through the exposed part of the single. It does not look like a nail pop. There are no other nail pops.
 
  #5  
Old 06-20-09, 08:26 AM
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by edge10 View Post
This area was just repaired and it looks like the nail was mistakenly driven through the exposed part of the single. It does not look like a nail pop. There are no other nail pops.
Ahh that's what we call a "shiner" since the shiny head of the nail can be easily seen in bright sun light.

I'd fix it by removing the nail, pumping the hole full of polyurethane caulk, then installing a longer nail in the same hole and culking again.... most guys will just caulk right over the exposed nail head and call it done.
 
  #6  
Old 06-20-09, 03:30 PM
E
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: US
Posts: 242
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ReliableAmerica View Post
Ahh that's what we call a "shiner" since the shiny head of the nail can be easily seen in bright sun light.

I'd fix it by removing the nail, pumping the hole full of polyurethane caulk, then installing a longer nail in the same hole and culking again.... most guys will just caulk right over the exposed nail head and call it done.
"Shiner" the names makes sense, that's how I spotted it. Would replacing the shingle be a even better repair or will that cause more problems? This repair was just done by a contractor and was in a trouble prone area, so I would like the repair on the repair to hold up.
 
  #7  
Old 06-20-09, 04:49 PM
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 18
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Replaceing the shingle is no problem so long as he can break the seal of the upper and lower shingle without damaging the upper and lower shingle. This is usually not a problem if the shingles are not 15+ years old. Then the upper and lower shingle should be sealed to the new shingle with a polyurethane caulk to take place of the broken seal strips.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: