shingles not laying flat


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Old 11-21-09, 06:39 PM
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shingles not laying flat

I replaced a section of my roof last month and not all of the shingles have laid flat yet. The repair was made on the north side of the roof(not much sun) and there are not many warm days left.

Any ideas on how I can get them to lay flat before winter?

Here's a pic

Pictures by castle1500 - Photobucket

Thanks!
 
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Old 11-21-09, 07:52 PM
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your electrical service does not look legal.


anyway, how patient are you? Either a high powered hair dryer and a cardboard box or a real heat gun and a cardboard box and a lot of patience.

What you do is fill the box with cans of beer, hoist the box and the heat source onto the roof. Remove all the beer from box. Cut out an opening in one side so you can shoot the heat onto the shingle and the box will act as a wind block so the shingle will not be cooled by the air.

Since this will take a considerable time, drink the beer while you hold the heat gun.

You may need to refill the box several times.

once the shingle is heated thoroughly and softened, set a weight (such as an 8X8X16 block) on the shingle to flatten it and hopefully allow it to adhere to the surrounding shingles.

Continue this process until done.


safety note: if you get tipsy easily, you might want to tie yourself with a rope over the peak of the roof and to something on the ground on the other side so you don't fall off the roof.
 
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Old 11-21-09, 07:55 PM
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Unless you live in an area with high winds, I doubt it will be an issue.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 05:41 AM
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Originally Posted by nap
safety note: if you get tipsy easily, you might want to tie yourself with a rope over the peak of the roof and to something on the ground on the other side so you don't fall off the roof.
Make sure you don't tie the rope to the bumper on your wife's car. :P
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:04 AM
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ok

so why is my electrical service not legal?
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:49 AM
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what is the distance from the bottom of the drip loop to the roof immediately below any given loop?

Now, take note, I said it does not look legal (to my trained eagle (real old eagle anyway) eye. I cannot measure the actual distance but it looks too close to the roof.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 12:07 PM
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hhmm..

I'll ask my electrician who did the work for me.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 12:35 PM
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225.19(A) exception #3 specifies a minimum clearance of 18" from the lowest point of the conductor to the roof immediately below it.

My old man eyes spy that out to be about 12 inches in your picture.


The drip loops look to be less than 18" which would be illegal. You also must have a drip loop as well to prevent water from running down the conductor into the meter base(which you do have. I included that simply so you do not just pull the conductors up to add height and incidentally remove the drip loop).

Obviously if the inspector approved the installation it isn't a big deal now. Just something I happened to see.

That is one reason I tend to not cut a 10' piece of rigid or IMC pipe when installing a pipe riser. Since AEP electric (the POCO in my area) specs meter height from 4' to 6' to center of meter, that makes the top of the pipe at ~15 feet. The clearance above the ground must be 12 feet minimum from the ground (residential and less than 300 volts to ground)(some inspectors will read the requirement as 10 feet but I would rather be safe than sorry and use the 12 foot minimum). That 15' above ground weatherhead (and subsequent pole attachment a little bit lower) leaves room for some line sag and is still good.

but, like I said, if the inspector has already said you are good to go, not a big issue.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:47 PM
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the drip loops are currently 16", so I'll ask the electrician what we need to do.

thanks!
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:53 PM
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actually I do not think I would mess with for the 2" it but if you want to make it 100%, the electrician can simply bend up the conductors so they are no less than the minimum required 18".
 
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Old 11-24-09, 08:28 PM
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this is why I have new service

Pictures by castle1500 - Photobucket

and why I am concerned about the shingles not laying down. the ice got underneath right at the point where the service formerly connected to the roof. it was raining down the wall in my garage above the ckt brkr panel.
 
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Old 11-24-09, 08:53 PM
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wow!! can't say I ever seen a service like that one. I know that was not legal. I can see 3 NEC violations with just a quick look.

It looks like you might have ice damming problems with the ice in the gutters and all.

A shingle is not intended to seal that well. It is designed to allow the water to shed downward off the roof. If you have ice damming, the water actually ends up setting on the roof and will be able to run under the shingles. That is why you use ice and water shield on the roof. I do not know the code spec but it is to be taken somewhere above the eave where the wall supports the truss/rafter.

Even that may not prevent all the water since I have seen water run inside the soffit and end up running down the wall.

Due to that, you really need to prevent the ice damming.
 
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Old 11-27-09, 07:27 AM
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well, they built the house that way(and others) 50 years ago.

this wall is on the north side of the house. it's the back wall of the attached garage. I am unable to put a ceiling/insulated in the garage because there is no way to attach it. there are only minimal trusses, that's the way they built them back then. so the garage is wide up to the roof. the warmer air(a little warmer than outside) is in the garage and causes the dams as it escapes under the soffits.

so I think that I'm going to put heat cable up on the section of the roof.
 
 

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