Waterproof issue where Cedar Siding meets Stucco

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Old 03-31-10, 12:30 PM
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Waterproof issue where Cedar Siding meets Stucco

Hey Folks, thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

Have a 100+ year old house, so nothing is up to code/standard i'm sure.

The back of the house (tinypic DOT com/r/synmhk/5) was sinking so footers poured, header built and the house was raised a few inches. The problem is, during the raising, where the cedar meets the stucco (as shown by the yellow circle) was moved out of alignment, and repatched poorly. Instead of the cedar extended out past the stucco, in many cases they are flush, and in some, the stucco even pushed past the bottom row of the cedar.

As expected, when it rains against that side of the house, water runs down the cedar and pours into the house at this intersection of the two.

I'm looking for a way to stop this from happening (not necessarily temporary, but short of ripping down the stucco and siding all the way to the bottom.)

My original thought was to use some L shaped aluminum, gluing part under the cedar to allow an overhang over the stucco. However, I'm not a tradesman by any stretch, so I have no idea if this would work.

Again, thanks for any help you can provide.
 

Last edited by chops11; 03-31-10 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 03-31-10, 02:03 PM
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I don't know how to access your pic

Would caulking wear the stucco and wood meet work?
 
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Old 03-31-10, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
I don't know how to access your pic

Would caulking wear the stucco and wood meet work?

The site isn't letting me post a link fully:

http://tinypic. com/r/synmhk/5

just remove the space after the . above.


I don't believe caulking would work, as you'll see, the stucco comes out beyond the cedar.
 
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Old 03-31-10, 02:21 PM
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It's a shame they couldn't have kept the stucco from coming out past the siding

IMO the easiest fix would be to chisel the stucco back some and then use caulking. Flashing would work well but I'm not sure how you would get it behind the shingles far enough to be effective.
 
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Old 03-31-10, 06:06 PM
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Yeah, that's a pretty bad patch job. I guess my first thought would be to make a level cut across the top of the door trim, so that the top of the window trim and the top of the door trim are level with each other. Then continue that cut line across the stucco the length of the wall. Use a chalk line and follow it perfectly so that it's arrow straight. Remove any stucco above this line.

Then measure up about 3 5/8" and snap another chalk line. This time, cut into the cedar siding. Again, these cut lines need to be perfectly straight and parallel with each other. Remove any cedar siding below this line. If any shingles want to slip down from above, slide them back up and tack them in place with a small galvanized finish nail about 3" above the cut line.

Slip a metal drip cap behind all layers of shingles and hopefully behind your tar paper. Then install a trim board under the drip cap. It could be a cedar 2x4 or something 5/4 thick or similar. You want a trim board that will give you enough thickness that you could then caulk the underside of the trim board to the stucco. (ideally, you'd rabbet the bottom of that trim board, creating a notch that would act as a drip edge, so that you aren't relying on caulk to weatherproof the joint.)

This is a pretty involved solution and it would also change the look of the house somewhat, but it could be painted the same color as the siding above so that from a distance nothing would really have changed.

It might be simpler to have a mason come out, beat off the stucco along the top, install a drip cap under the shingle siding, and stucco underneath the new drip cap. But it looks like the flashing above that door could use some help too.
 
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Old 04-01-10, 08:37 AM
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Terrific advice. Thank you for taking the time. I was afraid that the solution was going to be this involved, but I don't see much of a choice.

Thanks again.

Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Yeah, that's a pretty bad patch job. I guess my first thought would be to make a level cut across the top of the door trim, so that the top of the window trim and the top of the door trim are level with each other. Then continue that cut line across the stucco the length of the wall. Use a chalk line and follow it perfectly so that it's arrow straight. Remove any stucco above this line.

Then measure up about 3 5/8" and snap another chalk line. This time, cut into the cedar siding. Again, these cut lines need to be perfectly straight and parallel with each other. Remove any cedar siding below this line. If any shingles want to slip down from above, slide them back up and tack them in place with a small galvanized finish nail about 3" above the cut line.

Slip a metal drip cap behind all layers of shingles and hopefully behind your tar paper. Then install a trim board under the drip cap. It could be a cedar 2x4 or something 5/4 thick or similar. You want a trim board that will give you enough thickness that you could then caulk the underside of the trim board to the stucco. (ideally, you'd rabbet the bottom of that trim board, creating a notch that would act as a drip edge, so that you aren't relying on caulk to weatherproof the joint.)

This is a pretty involved solution and it would also change the look of the house somewhat, but it could be painted the same color as the siding above so that from a distance nothing would really have changed.

It might be simpler to have a mason come out, beat off the stucco along the top, install a drip cap under the shingle siding, and stucco underneath the new drip cap. But it looks like the flashing above that door could use some help too.
 
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