Caulking drip edge?


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Old 08-17-10, 12:33 PM
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Caulking drip edge?

I just finished the re-roofing on my shed. Is it advisable to caulk the bottom edge of the drip edge before I give the trim a final coat of paint? Because it's a shed there won't be any gutters on it, and I don't want moisture getting up under there again.
 
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Old 08-17-10, 01:01 PM
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Caulking where I think you mean would defeat the purpose of the drip edge. The little flipped out bend at the bottom will allow water to run over and drip off. Except for some minor capillary action...water won't run up hill.

Fill that gap with caulk and you are providing a path for possible wickage and eliminating that bit of airflow.
 
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Old 08-17-10, 01:12 PM
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As GunGuy said. It sounds as if you installed the drip edge touching the trim......... There should be a gap between them, big as a raindrip- 3/8-1/2".

Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 08-17-10, 02:31 PM
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The guy at the big box store told me to "install it so that it sat right up snug to the trim board, otherwise rain could blow up under it".
Crap, now the roof is done and the bottom edge sits right on the board
Ok, now that I don't have the required space, should I lift it out a bit with a screwdriver and just run a bead of caulk up under it??
 
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Old 08-17-10, 02:36 PM
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Could you supply us a pic or two?

I've always been conscientious about caulking everything that needs caulking when painting a house but I've never caulked a drip edge.
 
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Old 08-17-10, 05:41 PM
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I just took a couple of pics but it's getting dark out and the flash goes off and cast a shadow that's deceptive. I'll try tomorrow in full sun.
 
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Old 08-18-10, 08:54 AM
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I hope these pics help, it's pretty hard to get white on white to show what you want it to. If you can see it you will see how it sits right on the fascia board.
(My logic with the caulk is; if air can get in so can moisture, moisture eventually leads to rot. I'm with Mark to caulk is better than to be sorry later)



 
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Old 08-18-10, 08:58 AM
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Hope these pics help. White on white is pretty hard to get. My logic on the caulk is; if air can get up in there then so can moisture. Moisture will eventually lead to rot.



 
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Old 08-18-10, 09:17 AM
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Here's another question...did you put a coat on the trim before you put on the drip edge? Or was the existing paint in good shape?

What you suggested about using a putty knife (not a screwdriver) and lifting it to get a small bead might be ok, as long as its not filling the gap between the flipped edge and trim, but it seems to me that it would be quite a bit of slow work for very little (if any) gain. And you might crease or bend the edge in the process. You'd also be blocking the drainage path for any moisture that does find its way in somehow.

I'd bet $100 (Monopoly dollars of course) that you could look at 10,000 houses with dripedge installed...and not a single one has any caulk under it.

Also...painted trim and other wood (even unpainted) gets wet all the time...but won't rot if it can dry out. It's when airflow and drainage are restricted that the rot starts.

You did ask for opinions here...right? lol That was mine.
 
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Old 08-18-10, 10:16 AM
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I wouldn't caulk it. I think it will be ok like it is although it would have been nice for it to stick out a little further. A lot of builders use a 1x2 at the top of the fascia and then install the drip edge. Some builders around here don't even install a drip edge

I agree with Vic, I suspect caulking would do more harm than good. It's possible it would trap moisture above the caulk. Not sure how much of an issue it would be but sometimes aluminum sweats and that water would be trapped on the backside. Also since the drip edge is somewhat flexible, the caulking might crack after awhile.
 
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Old 08-18-10, 04:07 PM
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Thanks
The purpose of coming here is to gain knowledge, can't learn if you have a closed mind

Question: Could I go along the bottom (with the putty knife) and bend the drip edge out just a hair?
I put up new fascia board, primed and painted it before I put it up. I want to go over it one more time just to cover up the nail heads. (I put a dab of wood filler on them)

I guess it just ticks me off that the people who sell the stuff don't even know how to use it correctly.
 
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Old 08-19-10, 04:44 AM
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I don't know for sure about the other depts but with painting, you'll almost always get better advice at a paint store versus a big box paint dept. Generally a specialty store will do a better job of training their help - plus they only need to know about one phase of the construction industry.

I don't see where there would be any harm in bending the drip edge out a little. The wider your putty knife is the less likely hood there will be that you'll damage the the metal.
 
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Old 08-19-10, 07:09 PM
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I have a 14" plaster blade, I'll use that. The average Joe has to use the big box store for construction materials. Most places that deal with construction materials only deal with contractors who can come up with a tax number. I do buy my paint from the local paint store. That crap they carry at the big box store is usually worth just what you pay for it. I guess Behr makes a pretty good paint, never used it.

Thanks again for the advice.
 
 

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