"Super Gutter" membrane breaking up

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Old 03-23-11, 10:50 PM
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"Super Gutter" membrane breaking up

I have a house with a unique design where part of the roof water is carried away using what is called a super gutter or sometimes referred to as a dutch gutter. Basically, the bottom of the roof overhang is framed with a vertical "lip" and the valley there serves as the gutter.

In my case, the design of the house has this gutter sandwiched between the roof on one side and a raised screen enclosure on the other end. The screen enclosure is attached to the 2x PT wood fascia that is part of the roof framing.

The gutter looks like this.



A sketch of the framing structure below.



The gutter has a "rubber" like compound, with some "granules" on top. It is supposed to carry water to a low spot in the corner with a downspout but the slope is almost flat so at times water will pond in the gutter here and there. Over time this material is breaking up.



Any suggestions as to what I need to do to repair this membrane?

Do I remove a row or two of tiles, remove the membrane and apply a new one with rubber patch and granules?

or do I apply some product on top of this?

Thanks in advance for any comments and suggestions.
 
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Old 03-24-11, 04:19 PM
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I wouldn't put anything on top of it.
 
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Old 03-24-11, 06:54 PM
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I assume by that you mean any coating over this will not work and the only valid course of action is to rip it up and replace it?

I had one roofer came and he recommended that I remove the top two rows of tiles all the way around, remove the membrane all the way back to plywood, then line the gutter with seamless copper. Sounds good only just the material price is prohibitive.
 
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Old 03-25-11, 01:40 AM
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If you cover it, how do you seal the gap between the tiles & whatever you use to cover the membrane? The roofer gave you a 30 year answer. How much did he want to do the job?
 
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Old 03-25-11, 06:38 AM
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This is what he recommended.

First, remove the bottom two rows of concrete tiles nearest to the gutter. He said somewhere below that is the original seam between the roofing membrane and the gutter membrane, he said it should be "90 pound paper" under the tiles but the gutter liner is "bituminous", to be honest I am not sure what that meant precisely, but I got the general idea.

The removal needs to be done all the way around where the house wraps around the screen enclosure for the pool, all together about 170 linear feet of gutter.

Second, remove all those materials from the gutter from the membrane to the flashing on the edge. All the way down to the plywood.

Then he can get copper sheets about 24" wide or so, and hand form the sheet to the shape of the gutter. The new copper gutter will start from the same spot under the tiles, down to the bottom of the gutter, comes up, wraps around the lip of the gutter, goes over. I didn't ask him how he would secure it, I assume some sort of nail on the actual gutter and some water right screws on the lip?

Then he will install the copper sheet the same way he installs flashings. He will apply some roofing adhesive and lay some 90# paper overlapping part of the roof and part of the copper and more adhesive?

Lastly he will install the last two rows of tiles back.

He told me just the copper materials we are talking $5000 and up for his cost, not including labor and other materials, chemicals, adhesive, new tiles.

The price he threw out there is $14000, as an estimate. He said if I am interested he can do a more detailed estimate. For example, he said since the gutter is pretty flat, when they take it back to the plywood, he can get some "tapered underlayment" to give it come slope before the copper goes on. That would cost extra.
 
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Old 03-25-11, 07:28 AM
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That is alot of money anyway you look at it. Call a second guy for another opinion & estimate.
 
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Old 03-25-11, 07:37 AM
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Not a roofer but wouldn't lead or aluminum be cheaper than copper and still have a long life?
 
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