Replacing Rotted Fascia


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Old 08-09-11, 03:24 PM
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Replacing Rotted Fascia

I have some rotten cedar fascia that needs replacing. I have a tile roof on my house with a drip edge, I would love to replace the fascia without damaging the drip edge. But, if I damage the drip edge to the point that it needs replacing, how would I install a new drip edge on a tile roof?
 
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Old 08-09-11, 03:29 PM
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No expert on tile roofs...except by helping my neighbor. You should be able to cut the nails holding it to the rafters with a sawsall then pull it straight down and out and slide the new one in.

Replacing the dripedge...I dunno....no tile roofs around here have them...thats a function of the tile if it was installed far enough over the edge.

AZ may be different than FL.
 
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Old 08-09-11, 06:01 PM
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If your house has soffit, your fascia may have a dado cut in the back of it, making removal a little harder. What I would do is take a skilsaw and cut the fascia lengthwise, separating it into a top half and a bottom half. Then you can knock the bottom half off without any problem, and there should be half the nails to cut. You can then do as gunguy said and use a reciprocating saw to carefully cut behind the fascia, cutting the nails that remain. (If there is no soffit, you would take a hammer and smack the back side of the fascia to make a little separation so that you can get the reciprocating saw blade in there to cut.) Once all the nails have been cut the top half of the fascia should just drop right out.
 
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Old 08-10-11, 11:19 AM
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I have aluminum soffits there also. Would those have to come out first and then try to get the fascia off, or can I take the fascia off before removing soffits?
 
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Old 08-10-11, 06:00 PM
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Hard to tell without a closeup picture of the area. Not sure how they would have done aluminum soffits without covering up the face of your cedar fascia. I'm imagining they stapled a j-channel to the soffit, in which case nothing would be attached to the fascia. If that's the case, then you should be able to remove your fascia without touching the soffit at all. Ripping it in half is still a good idea, IMO.
 
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Old 08-11-11, 07:16 AM
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Here is a picture of the rotted fascia:

 
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Old 08-11-11, 11:12 AM
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Oh, that's not at all what I was picturing. Your thick board is called the fascia. The rotted board is actually just a 1x2 or 1x4 drip edge. You should be able to get behind that with a pry bar and pry it loose maybe 1/4"... just enough to get a reciprocating blade in there. Use a fine metal cutting blade in your saw (like the 9" Milwaukee torch blades) so that it doesn't yank down on the nails as you cut them.

Hopefully that 6" d-style drip edge isn't nailed into the top of your wood drip edge. If you're careful you should be able to get it out without damaging the tile, cement, or 6" d-style drip edge.
 
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Old 08-12-11, 05:23 PM
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What kind of damage can be done with rotted fascia? The reason I ask is that I might not have time now to replace it for a little while. Is there any way that rotted fascia could cause linking inside the house? And what danger is there for letting it go for a little while before fixing it?
 
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Old 08-13-11, 05:29 AM
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Rotten wood will hold moisture so it's possible that the rotten 1x2 can cause damage to the fascia board. How long do you need to wait before you make the repairs? It's doubtful the damage will allow water to enter your home.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
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Old 08-13-11, 04:11 PM
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Its looking like a couple of weeks. I attached another picture to show how rotten the wood is. This is my finger pushing the wood in, and the wood is like mush. It looks like underneath the rotted wood, that it has started to rot on the fascia. So I will have to take both pieces down without damaging the drip edge hopefully.

Can those drip edge's be bent up to move it out of the way, or will that risk breaking it? Thanks for the help, and forgive me for my ignorance on this.

 
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Old 08-13-11, 04:22 PM
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Wow, it looks like the paint's stronger than the wood

You can bend the drip edge some but you need to be careful, if it gets distorted it will be difficult to get it back into it's original shape.
 
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Old 08-13-11, 04:55 PM
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Something else to consider... if you have rotten wood underneath a metal flashing, it's pretty likely that water is getting behind the metal flashing somehow. You might want examine those areas and see if maybe that flashing (under the concrete) has any pitch on the top- if it happens to be flat you might have water running backward on top of the flashing, then getting in on top of the wood drip cap, causing it to rot out. Like on the corner you pictured, that gap on the top corner of the flashing is letting water in where it can get trapped. Some sealant in those places might help keep the water out and prevent your new wood from rotting a few years later.
 
 

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