gutter issues


  #1  
Old 10-24-11, 04:05 PM
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gutter issues

Water drips behind the raingutters on our house and is ruining the facia board underneath. Here's pictures above and below:
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...ll1/gutter.jpg
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...ull1/002-4.jpg
As you may be able to see in the first picture there is evidence of old caulking smeared above the gutter to try to help, but it doesnt.
I'm fairly certain the problem has something to do with improper installation of drip edge. There is a metal edge underneath the overhanging shingles, but it just has a straight edge on the bottom and doesnt seem to extend very far at all over the gutter. Most of the roof water drips into the gutter, but some runs back, under the leading shingle and metal edge, getting the fascia saturated. What is the proper fix and what will it entail to get the situation remedied?
Any comments/advice appreciated.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 06:10 PM
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Looks like they used d-style drip edge instead of gutter apron. Hard to tell when the picture is so dark. If you set your flash to "on" instead of auto you'll get a better picture.

About the only thing you can do at this point is remove a section of gutter hanger brackets, and then shove some strips of metal flashing up under the drip edge. Most hardware stores will sell coils of aluminum flashing that are say, 4" x 25' long. You could cut that in half with tin snips so that you have two 2" strips that are 25' long, then tuck those pieces under the drip edge and secure them with some self-tapping sheetmetal screws. Then reinstall the gutter brackets. Cutting the pieces of coil shorter, and doing 8 ft at a time will probably be a good idea.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 07:27 PM
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Here's a couple of better pictures which hopefully can show more clearly the current situation:
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...ll1/better.jpg
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/b...l1/better2.jpg
There's a metal strip (rusty looking, rounded edge) seen installed under the first row of shingles, which extends maybe a half inch over the gutter. The strip is flat (no bends extending down beyond what can be seen). The area above the gutter bracket and below the metal strip is fascia (with old dirty caulk on it). The water off the roof just kind of rolls up under the rounded metal edge there and back between the back of the gutter and the wooden fascia. With the better pictures here, maybe re-describe a proper fix? thanks
 
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Old 10-24-11, 08:10 PM
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Well your drip edge looks very old and rusty (salt from ocean air?) or like it hasn't been replaced in 50 yrs. It also looks like portions of the gutter may have been installed IN FRONT OF the drip edge, rather than behind it, or like you said, if you can see the wood fascia over the top of the gutter then either the flashing should have been longer or the gutter should have been higher. If you can see wood over the gutter, then the strips of flashing I mentioned earlier would work.

But I guess the question is, will you be replacing the shingles anytime soon? Because that's the best time to replace the drip edge. In order to replace the drip edge, you would surely have to remove and replace some shingles, which is pretty hard to do if they are old and brittle.

It "might" be possible to slip a new drip edge under your shingles, and over the top of the old one. You would probably want to use gutter apron if you can find it in your area... otherwise you'd want 6" d-style drip edge, not 5" d-style drip edge. the 6" will have a longer leg in front to cover your gutter better. When you slip the new flashing under the shingles you want to try to get it under not only the first shingle, but also under the "starter row" of shingles that is directly below it (it will be under 2 thicknesses of shingles).
 
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Old 10-24-11, 08:49 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
will you be replacing the shingles anytime soon?
"might" be possible to slip a new drip edge under your shingles, and over the top of the old one. You would probably want to use gutter apron if you can find it in your area... otherwise you'd want 6" d-style drip edge
If it "might" be possible to slip new drip edge under shingles, what is likely to make it not possible? Shingle nails in the way maybe?
If I can get gutter apron as opposed to 6" d-style drip edge, what makes that the preferable option?
I don't plan on replacing all the roof shingles anytime soon, as they're still in decent shape. However I'm willing to remove and then replace (with new) the first row or so of shingles if to install a proper drip edge if that's really the best approach. Likely will have a pro do the work but am just rather curious about the actual extent of work probably involved here for a proper fix. thanks again
 
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Old 10-24-11, 08:57 PM
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Yes, shingle nails, or even the nails holding down the old drip edge. They tend to lift over time, so as you slide the old one in, it can catch on the old nails, making it a real PITA. Sometimes somebody got the bright idea of putting roof tar along the bottom edge, which is also a pain to fight.

Gutter apron is preferable because it is a different shape (more like an L turned 90) and it has a longer lip on the front edge. Only drawback with gutter apron is that the front edge might be TOO long, depending on how much room you have over those gutter brackets.

The problem with replacing the first row or two of shingles, again, is that if the shingles are crispy at all, it's hard to get the nails pulled from under the shingles that you will be *leaving*... and then it's hard to renail them if they are brittle. Course maybe some guys would just glue them back down. So it's certainly possible, but it would be a difficult DIY job if you aren't accustomed to shingling.
 
 

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