Gutter levelling


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Old 01-31-12, 03:28 PM
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Gutter levelling

One end of my roof gutter was installed sloped the wrong way (about 2 inches over 8 feet). I cannot correct the slope, as the end of the gutter is embedded in stucco.

One idea I had was to use some kind of levelling compound inside the gutter, to at least correct the grade to zero.

Is this a good idea, or am I being a little too lazy-- I mean creative?

Will levelling compound cure correctly at two inches deep? What about ordinary plaster of paris? Epoxy? Will any of these fail to bond to the gutter (which is very rusty inside)?
 
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Old 01-31-12, 04:39 PM
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Leveling compound will "level" itself, and that isn't what you want. You want a slope toward the downspouts. Anyway you could post pictures of what you have? I have never seen gutters embedded in stucco...at least not yet. If the gutter is rusty, why bother? Replace them. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 01-31-12, 04:53 PM
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And how does a gutter get rusty? Most modern gutters are aluminum....
 
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Old 01-31-12, 06:06 PM
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the house i am staying in now, has steel gutters. and they are a little rusty in places. i actually used spray paint to stop a leak right over the door.
 
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Old 01-31-12, 07:18 PM
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I'll post a picture of the gutter tomorrow. The main reason why I don't want to do a lot of work on this is that it is a second-story, and I'm reluctant to do a lot of working while standing on an extension ladder.

I think the house was stuccoed after the gutters were in place, so now they can't be moved. Even if levelling compound made the gutter level, it would be an improvement from a two-inch mosquito pond.

As for how it got rusty, it appears to be galvanized steel, not aluminum.
 
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Old 02-01-12, 04:02 PM
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Old 02-01-12, 06:18 PM
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i am no pro. but i think i would remove the defective gutters and do them correctly. and with that stucco in the pics, i would make some kind of cap for it and seal it in place. and run the new gutter up to that.
 
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Old 02-02-12, 08:49 AM
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if you do not want to go to the trouble of replacing the gutter, patching the stucco, etc. I would simply add a hole at the low point. Not sure what a downspout at this location would do to your home in terms of apperance but it would solve the problem. it is possible that the installer did not install the gutter with the wrong pitch but rather installed the gutter this way with the intention of cutting in a downspout at this point and he forgot to do so.
 
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Old 02-02-12, 12:35 PM
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Here's a better picture. There's some kind of lip on the top of the gutter that goes over the fascia and under the roof, so it can't be moved.

I don't think that the builder intended to put a downspout here; there's one in the other direction about 10 feet around a corner, and this spot is right over a walkway. I think it's more likely that a subcontractor just got bored on the 37th tract home, and wasn't paying attention.

I'm going to attempt my levelling compound idea; if it doesn't work out, then I'll be out the cost of that, but otherwise no worse off. Will let you all know!

 
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Old 02-09-12, 10:28 AM
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After further inspection, I discovered that the gutter is rusting through in a few places. Doubtless from months of standing water.

Here's the new plan:
I'm going to try putting a second (smaller) gutter inside the existing one, with the correct pitch, and feeding into the section where the pitch is correct. (Did I just explain that well?)

I'll try to seal it in nicely, so the existing gutter will just be there for appearance. I'll drill some holes in the "outer" gutter for ventilation too.

Any possible problems with this?
 
 

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