Asphalt singles on shed style roof.

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Old 04-25-12, 02:47 PM
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Asphalt singles on shed style roof.

Sorry if this has been asked before... I am building an out-building and planning to make a shed style roof with asphalt shingles. What is the recommended method for sealing the front edge so that water does not leak under the shingles? Should the drip edge be installed on top of the shingles instead of beneath? Or is there special flashing or drip edge designed for this type of application?

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Old 04-25-12, 03:20 PM
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Every shed type roof I have built or seen has a roof that is larger than the building. All sides of the roof overhang 1 to 2 feet. That said, you would have soffit boards all around and drip edge on all sides. You can then close off those soffits with regular soffit material or paint the exposed sheathing to prevent water damage.
 
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Old 04-25-12, 03:36 PM
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Thanks Badeyeben... but I am wondering about sealing the shingles at the leading edge. On a gable roof, the peak is sealed off using either cut-off tabs or special ridge shingles which cover the peak. On a shed style roof, there is only one half of a peak so to speak. So how do you seal that leading edge? Lots of tar?
 
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Old 04-25-12, 03:53 PM
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Ahh....I was reading leading edge as lower edge.

No Pro...but it would make sense to put the upper drip edge over the shingles with a bead of appropriate calk underneath. You'd want to use the stuff with the wider part that goes one the roof deck. Think it's like 4 inches deep?
 
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Old 04-25-12, 03:58 PM
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Thanks Gunguy... Love the icon...
 
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Old 04-26-12, 06:17 PM
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Here is how I installed my last shed roof leading edge. I installed the tar paper then the drip edge on all sides. Top or leading edge last on the drip edge. It was over top the side pieces in the shingle area. Then after roofing up the roof toward the top when I got to the very top I placed a bead of asphalt. This was out of the caulking tube type asphalt sealer. Then I used a starter strip at the top with the tar strip on it at the very top edge. meaning I trimmed it so the tar strips were only 1/2 inch below the top of the roof. I applied the finish shingles to the top and trimmed them to a length that was 1/2 inch past the drip edge. Then I applied asphalt to the nail heads and used granules found in the packaging (saved it from every package I opened) and spread the granules over these nail heads.
That was a little over 8 year ago and I have had no leaks. Now my roof faces south (bottom to top) so the stormy weather that comes from the southwest works on that edge pretty good. I think that small edge being full with no cuts is best to point into the storm compared to exposing the cut or grooved edges of all the shingles pointed into the storm. With the architectural shingles it probably wouldn't matter.
 
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Old 04-30-12, 03:45 AM
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Thanks badeyeben, So it sounds like the trick is to just make sure you seal it very good. I just wasn't sure if there was an overlaping method or product like what is typically used in applying shingles on other areas.
 
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Old 04-30-12, 03:52 AM
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If it is a pure shed roof with no attachment on the high side to another building (and that is what I have pictured), It would benefit you to make a "break over" on top, sort of like a peak, maybe 1' wide along the ridge. This will give you a place to terminate your shingles, as well as a place to utilize ridge pieces, and keep water from entering the high side of the shingles.
 
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Old 05-06-12, 12:46 PM
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Thanks Chandler... I think that makes the most sense. There doesn't seem to be a really good way to terminate shingles without some sort of peak involved. I see lots of shed style roofs built without a peak but I'm guessing they are just heavily tarred at the edge to seal out rain.
 
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