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What are the drains called that drain from downspouts to underground to yard?

What are the drains called that drain from downspouts to underground to yard?


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Old 07-02-12, 02:36 PM
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What are the drains called that drain from downspouts to underground to yard?

What are drains called that drain from downspouts, underground, to yard?
Ive seen them before but I have no idea what theyre called. As I understand, the downspout will go underground next to the foundation, connect to a pipe and the pipe will go somewhere away from the home, like a yard.

What are they called and how exactly do they work? How does the water get forced upward to drain into the yard? Or Im guessing they will only work if you're situation is the spot the drain goes is lower than where your gutter connects to the underground pipe?

If that's the case, then I guess this wouldnt work for me anyways.
 
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Old 07-03-12, 05:44 PM
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Sometimes that downspouts go underground to a dry well. Don't ask me why it's called a dry well when it gets wet. It's a barrel with holes in it that let's the water seep into the ground slowly.

If it doesn't go into a dry well, it may continue further away from the house into a perforated pipe. Most times it will be a dry well.
 
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Old 07-03-12, 06:28 PM
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Lawn pop up drains (emitters) work by gravity, water seeks its own level. Some have a perforated elbow so that standing water can seep away into the ground.

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Old 07-03-12, 07:02 PM
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Thanks for the responses. I thought briefly of a "dry" well, and honestly would not want to dig out a big dry well in a few different spots.

Id like to use these but is there something I need to consider as far as water seeking its own level? I guess i just cant get around how it would work if its not all down hill. All I can envision is water backlogging to the downspout. Not sure why, guess im just not good with physics
 
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Old 07-03-12, 07:20 PM
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You need to locate them someplace far enough away from the house so that the water runs away from the house. Not sure what part you don't understand.
 
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Old 07-04-12, 06:56 AM
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Sorry, I guess I just didnt understand how the water is able to go upward to bubble out of the drain emitter.
 
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Old 07-04-12, 10:13 AM
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These are very common in southern climates for sure. They open up enough with the water pressure behind them. They even use them for pool overflows. Not sure how well they work in colder climates where there can be significant ground frost and or some snow cover especially during spring melt season. Also not sure about how well the shallow pipe will hold up with water freezing during those times of day melt and night freezing for instance. I have personally only seen them used in warmer climates, but perhaps others have more experience further north.
 
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Old 07-05-12, 05:33 AM
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Yeah, I didnt even think of the climate. Looks like this would be a waste of time unless i want to dig really deep. I live in Connecticut and it would probably freeze up at times during the winter. Oh well, it was worth a thought
 
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Old 07-05-12, 06:01 AM
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There will always be water in the pipe for something like this so I would never install in a freezing climate.
 
 

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