Leaking roof on older mobile home

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Old 02-01-13, 06:37 PM
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Leaking roof on older mobile home

We have recently moved into an older mobile home and have discovered that we have some water damage, caused by the roof leaking. We are aware that the roof needs replacing and that isn't an issue.

However, as the home is to be relocated after spring thaw, we cannot address replacing the roof for another four months, as the haulers will not move it without the original roof on it.

Is there a temporary solution to get us through the next few months to prevent any further water damage. I appreciate that am asking for a 'band-aid' solution, but because of our unique situation, we cannot do nothing else in the meantime.

Any suggestions would be gratefully received. Thank you.
 
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Old 02-02-13, 05:05 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Roofing tar should work if you can determine where the leaks are. Is this a metal roof or shingles?
 
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Old 02-02-13, 06:10 AM
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"Older" trailers that I am familiar with have a metal skin with lock joints to join the panels.
We owned one like this at one time and found that penetrations was where leaks would occur.
If someone goes up there I would urge caution as the roof structure is easily damaged, especially if there is any rot.

You can get roof coatings especially for rv/mobile home use which is normally silver or off white.
 
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Old 02-02-13, 06:20 AM
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I've patched a lot of the older [flat/crown] metal MH roofs. Greg is right that the metal strips are one of the prone leak points. Also check around any vents that protrude out of the roof. Where the metal drip edge screws into the roof along the perimeter is also a prime area for leaks. IMO roofing tar does a better job than the KoolSeal type coatings. I've always sealed the leaks with tar and then applied the roof coating.

The older MHs use 1x2s with scrap paneling for gussets as their 'roof truss' system so care must be used when walking on the roof. It's better for a skinny person to go up there than an overweight one.
 
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Old 02-02-13, 06:26 AM
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I am attaching a picture of it so you can see the roof. It is a 1976 Paramount trailer.
 
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Old 02-02-13, 06:31 AM
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Wasn't sure how old your MH was. The top of the roof is the way Greg described. The area to seal should be within a few feet of the stained areas in your ceiling. Another trouble spot is where the rain runs down the siding looking for an entrance

I assume once you get the MH moved you plan to build a roof complete with overhang over the entire MH ?
 
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Old 02-02-13, 07:00 AM
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Thank you for all your replies.

@marksr Yes we plan to put a pitched roof with an overhang on it and are currently researching ways to do this that will not adversely affect the structural integrity of the trailer. We are intending on adding a mudroom and porch to the other side of the trailer and extending the roof over these. We want to design the 'additions' in a way that they will support the roof, albeit on that one side. Every little helps right?
 
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Old 02-02-13, 07:08 AM
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My house is an older MH with additions built across both sides and roof [complete with attic] over the whole thing. Extra insulation [over the metal] along with passive attic ventilation really helps in keeping the house cool in the summer..... not to mention removing the threat of reoccurring leaks.

Probably the most common method for building a roof over a MH is to use 4x4s spaced along the perimeter to carry the load. The method I prefer is to build a foundation that sticks out slightly from the bottom of the MH and then build a wood wall against the exterior of the MH. That wall will support the weight of the roof. It also gives you the option of adding more wall insulation. On your planned addition you could build the wall next to the MH high enough to support the roof rafters on that end.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 09:55 AM
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Most leaks are around a roof fitting like a plumbing vent pipe where the cap is gone or leaking where it seals to the roof. Check all your fittings and use caulk or roofers cement.
 
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