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House to be sold "as is". Partially replace the roof beforehand, or not?

House to be sold "as is". Partially replace the roof beforehand, or not?

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  #1  
Old 02-08-13, 10:22 AM
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House to be sold "as is". Partially replace the roof beforehand, or not?

Hello!

First time poster here. Attached are a few pictures of the roof of a house that will be sold "as is", sometime this year. It's most likely that some home remodeler will purchase it and do a major rehab, since it's not in livable condition with too many outdated systems inside. 15 years ago, a partial roof replacement was done. The roof has lots of dormers, and its overall shape when viewed from above is somewhat like three sides of a rectangle (with a flatter central section). The inward facing shingles were replaced, but the outward facing shingles were not.

At some points, whole areas of shingles are missing, and elsewhere the underlying wood has rotted. Best guess is that the older part of the roof dates from the 70's, maybe earlier. There has been some small water damage with the plaster over the years on the top floor where the dormers are, but nothing like what happened after gutter cleaners recently cleaned out several years of leaves and left a few holes in the roof itself. There was significant interior water damage at the next rainstorm (including a partially collapsed ceiling in a room two floors below).

The holes in the roof have been tarped, to cut down on further water damage, but the question comes up:

does it make financial sense for the owner to invest potentially tens of thousands of dollars to replace the older/outward facing portion of the roof now, when the plan is to sell the house "as is"? Would a home remodeler prefer to purchase a major rehab project with a 1998/2013 roof, or purchase the major rehab project with a 1970s/1998 roof with holes patched (not just tarped) at a lower price?

Maybe another way to ask the question, from the owner perspective: Would the owner be able to recoup the cost of replacing part of the roof, by getting higher offer prices from potential remodelers/buyers?

i.e., if x amount of dollars is invested to partially replace the roof, is it reasonable to think that amount could ever be recouped when the house is sold?

The house is located in NJ. I know the owner, and am trying to help out.

Any comments or follow up questions welcome!
 
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Old 02-08-13, 10:47 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I can't really answer the money aspect of your question but whatever needs to be done to prevent further damage should be done - even if it's just a patch job.
 
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Old 02-08-13, 10:55 AM
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In my opinion, it does not make sense to spend money on a new roof for a house in that poor condition. An 'average' homebuyer will never buy it, and there's so much other significant work that has to be done to it that putting some 'lipstick' on, really won't help.

The only caveat I think is to ensure that whatever holes there are are sealed well enough to prevent more water or animals from making more damage. If that means spending a few hundred $$ on a handyman to replace a bit of plywood and a small section of new shingles, I think that's worth it. It would be very clear though that the roof needs to be replaced by the new owner.

I don't think he'd ever make back the $10-15K on a new roof with everything else going on in the house.
 
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Old 02-08-13, 04:16 PM
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I agree with the others, especially Mike's comment regarding putting lipstick on a pig. It's still a pig, and pouring money into it will most likely not be recoverable via sale.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 09:04 AM
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Thanks for all of the responses. I have zero knowledge with buying/selling "as is" homes, where the buyer is expected to be someone who focuses on rehabs and will gut the house. In its current condition there's no way the house will pass inspection for someone wanting to move in to live immediately, so the pool of buyers is expected to be much smaller.

I don't really have any experience with roofing either, so given the crumbly state of the shingles on the older part of the roof, what would be good ways to fix those holes? Would it be possible to secure/slide some aluminum flashing in place, or are there better ways to handle it? What materials should be purchased at the local home depot?

The owner is an elderly man who I'm trying to help, I appreciate any input.

Thank goodness the tarps are in place, big snowfall in NJ yesterday!
 
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Old 02-09-13, 10:20 AM
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Aluminum might work, I was thinking more along the lines of replacing the plywood as needed and either adding new shingles where needed or maybe rolled roofing..... take my advice with a grain of salt - I'm a painter, not a roofer
 
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Old 02-09-13, 11:12 AM
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I always love the selling as is. If the seller is not concerned about the price, than leave it as is. The only person that could buy the home would be a cash buyer. About 33% of the market which would mean a much much lower price. Possibly even lower that the cost of a bare lot. Meet with a realtor and a contractor then weigh the options.
 
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Old 02-09-13, 02:22 PM
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I think some rolled aluminum would work fine. I'd spread a bead of roofing cement on three sides and slip it under the higher up shingles. Add a few roofing nails, and I think you've at least stopped the water.
 
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Old 02-12-13, 01:38 PM
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Thanks. I will go ahead and get rolled aluminum, roofing cement, and roofing nails at home depot. Looking at the homedepot website, does it matter if I get a tube of rubber wet patch roof cement vs. a tube of plastic roof cement? Is one better than the other given the state of the shingles surrounding the holes?
 
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