Installing gutters onto stucco house

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Old 03-07-13, 03:14 PM
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Installing gutters onto stucco house

Hey folks,

My house has a parapet-style roof that drains through 5 scuppers. 2 of the scuppers drop the water directly to the ground (the other 3 flow onto other roofs). I'd like to redirect the water from these two scuppers by installing conductor boxes on each and then a gutter to carry the water away. It is a short run - only 23' - and the local gutter installation companies have 70' minimums, sooooo... I'm on my own and have questions!

1) Materials. The wall that is being gutterized is north-facing and made from stucco. My choices from Lowes/Home Depot are vinyl and aluminum. I'm inclined to choose aluminum over vinyl simply because I suspect it will last longer, but have read that direct contact with the lime in the stucco will corrode the aluminum over time.
Is this true?
I plan on painting the gutters using spray paint to match other fixtures on my house - would the painting prevent corrosion?
Is there something I should purchase to install between the stucco and gutter to provide a barrier so there isn't any direct contact between the two materials?
Should I reconsider vinyl? Or another material (Gavalume? Galvanized steel?)

2) Installation. It seems pretty straightforward, procedurally, but the information I've found is almost exclusively geared towards installing gutters at the roofline into fascia board.
Is there anything I need to take into account as I install my gutters onto a stucco wall?

Thanks so very much in advance for any help you can provide!
 
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Old 03-07-13, 08:23 PM
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Guessing the home is painted. If so, the coat of paint should provide a barrier between the aluminum and lime in the stucco. Have you considered installing the conductor box with a downspout to the ground. I can see what you are saying but don't understand why you are running gutters on the side of the house.
You need to figure out how the stucco is applied and what it is applied to so you can fasten the gutter properly.
 
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Old 03-08-13, 07:43 AM
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Yep, the house is definitely painted. Good to know that is enough to stop corrosion.

There are a few reasons why I can't just run a downspout. First, I think it'd be just ugly. Second, both scuppers are directly above windows, so I'd have to put some bends in the downspout to avoid looking at it every time I looked out the window (so... really, that's just another "it'd be ugly"). Finally, the downspouts would end in a bed that is going to be a garden someday and the water would wash out the dirt.

By running a gutter along the front of the house (which seems to be "common" here in AZ from pictures I've seen... if a place has gutters at all, that is) I can move the water out of the way of the windows and the garden, and go a little green by dropping it into a rain barrel.

I've attached a sketch of the wall (one as is, one with the gutters sketched in) if that helps.

As for construction: from the outside in, it is stucco, chicken wire, waterproof membrane, plywood, framing. I'm thinking that, instead of nails to secure the hangers, I could use galvanized screws long enough to go into the drywall...?
 
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Old 03-08-13, 05:51 PM
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I mean plywood. Galvanized screws long enough to go into the plywood.

Doh!

They'd be some looooooooooong screws to get through the drywall!
 
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Old 03-08-13, 08:47 PM
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They do make screws long enough to get to the drywall if you'd like? Sometimes there is an air space or woven material for air space between the stucco and the plywood. You could damage the stucco if you pull the screw for the gutter hanger too tight. I would predrill the holes in the stucco, apply some caulk in the hole and a bit between the gutter hanger and stucco so no water would enter around the screw. If you can get this style of hanger, you can snap a chalk line, install the hanger, place the gutter in the hangers and install the top strap. Very easy.
 
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Old 03-12-13, 10:28 AM
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Screws through the drywall might be a little overkill. Though... it would give me something to hang pictures from... if I didn't mind everything hanging right at the ceiling.

Thank you SO much for your recommendations and advice, Dan. Got the brackets you suggested ordered, as well as the conductor boxes and some other bits and bobs. Everything should be here on Thursday, so I can get started.

Again - thank you! I really appreciate it!
 
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Old 03-12-13, 07:11 PM
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Glad to help. Most of all be careful on that ladder.
 
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