do-it-myself roof

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Old 06-08-13, 09:48 AM
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do-it-myself roof

My roof asphalt shingle roof is way beyond it's *expected* lifespan as measured in years, though it's light colored and has actually held up rather well considering its age. It doesn't leak except during 3-day deluges when a little bit drips in around my single dormer. I imagine (I hope) the roof panels are solid but but shingles are curling, I just can't afford to have someone do it. Loans and credit are not an option right now, so I have two choices: Do it myself, or wait even longer. So I'm just looking for feedback on the do it myself option.

The big question is, could I break it down into a multi-year project, doing half the roof one year and half the next, in case weather or work prevent me from finishing? If so would it be better to from ridge to edge all the way down one side, or start at one end doing both slopes and working toward the other end?

I would hope to get occasional help from other people, but I can't count on how much I'll get so much of the labor would be done just by me. If I get more help than I currently expect well that's awesome.

The roof is about 19' from peak to bottom, and 70 feet long, so 2660 sq.ft. It's about 7 or 7.5 feet rise per 12 feet run, so pretty steep. Its 2 stories, at least in the middle . Each slope of the roof has about a 3' overhang and ends about 8' high. There are no gutters. What special considerations/equipment/setup would I need due to the steepness? I would need to buy/borrow/rent ladders, as all I have is a step ladder currently.

I will post pictures later this weekend, as the roof (and house) are kind of weird, having two different ridgelines for the garage and house.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 10:15 AM
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I personal would never suggest a one man DIY on a roof that steep, big or high.
Just getting all the shingles on the roof is going to be more them one person should do, unless you buy all the shingles at one time they may not match because there going to be differant lot #'s.
I always have at least 3 people when stripping and replacing shingles.
Everyone takes turn getting up on the roof or I order roof top delivery.
One stays on the ground cleaning up and at least two on the roof stripping.
Very bad idea to try and do it in sections. Your going to end up having to rip off work you have already done to do it that way.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 12:13 PM
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Not to mention that you will have to get a permit and I don't think any where would go for the partial job you are asking about. And that is NOT a one person job.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 03:41 PM
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I agree with the others, bad idea. With you having no roofing experience it makes it a VERY bad idea. My only suggestion is to patch as necessary until you can afford to have it done correctly.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 04:00 PM
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4th opinion. I know you don't need it. Roofing is hot, dry, thankless work. Just getting the shingles up is a task at 60 to 90 lbs. per bundle, depending on style (Works out to 80 trips up and down, one at a time). Then footing creeps up as a booger. Remember, it ain't the fall, but the sudden stop that makes for a frowny day. Leave it to the pros after you patch what you need to.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 04:58 PM
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well just humor me, as I play my own devil's advocate. 80 trips (or 40) really isn't that much if its spread out over a summer, is it? Do I have to remove all the shingles before I put any back down? Honestly I don't expect to do this entirely alone, I just can't expect assistance reliably. The down side of NOT doing it is I lower my property value and reduce my ability to sell.

It seems like the ability or inability of breaking it down in to multi-portions is the real crux of the issue here. I can't imagine a permit will be a problem where I live. I live in an unorganized territory, I'm not even sure if a permit is required and if it carried over into a second year I can't imagine anyone would care-except me, because I might have to get a second permit.

Again just pl;aying devils advocate here-I didn't expect overwhelming support for the idea. :-)
 
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Old 06-08-13, 06:20 PM
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You know, I was speaking from an old body. If you are young and energetic, and have the patience to do the job, yes it is DIY. Just not by yourself!! It is way too dangerous.
 
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Old 06-08-13, 07:10 PM
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You already stated that you would need to buy/borrow or rent ladders, that alone is a major amount of money. I personally would be quite leery of borrowing ladders as the condition and strength of the ladder could be questionable. Working on a second level roof it may be advantageous to use scaffolding up the side rather than ladders, jacks and planks. Then you would need the roof jacks to hold a plank as you work your way to the peak.

The actual laying of the shingles is pretty simple as long as you follow the instructions but the layout lines will fade or wash away if the job is stretched over the course of several months. Also, you need a method to seal the ends of the shingles to the roof deck on the areas where you stop due to lack of time materials or funds. This point alone argues for doing complete horizontal rows rather than sections from gutter to peak.

I've done some minor roofing, both built-up (near flat) roofs and three-tab shingles and I did it because I was minimally funded (read, poor) and it was no fun whatsoever. These roofs were garage tops, maybe eight feet above the ground at the gutter edge and approximately twenty feet long. It took me multiple days and I was beat at the end. The roof also looked like it was done by an amateur.
 
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Old 06-09-13, 05:40 PM
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Well I probably cant afford the project this year anyway-by my estimation I'm looking at about 3K just for the materials and not including ladders. So I have at least a year to make the kind of friends that will hang out on my steep, high roof in the hot sun for nothing more than a few beers. I wonder, where does one find those sorts of friends anyway? Prison maybe?
 
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Old 06-10-13, 04:29 AM
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Friends that you have also helped out in like manner..... or expect that you would return the favor someday.
 
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Old 06-10-13, 08:48 AM
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Sounds like a great weekend project. So other than ladders, I guess you have every thing else. Safety harness and line, hammers, flat bar, utility knives, compressor, hoses, nail guns, tool belts, tape measure, pencil, chalk box, stapler, tin snip, shingle snip, circular saw, extension cords, trailer (preferable dump), sweeper magnet, tarps and plywood, shingle eaters, a good broom or blower, four hard working buddies and a cooler full of energy drinks. Beers and roofing don't work very well together.
 
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Old 06-13-13, 07:07 AM
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Hey dan, it's a DIY forum. Perhaps you were looking for the Talk Condescendingly to DIYers Forum.
 
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Old 06-13-13, 09:46 PM
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Actually, I just got out of prison, I mean finished a roof job and was giving a check list of items that would be needed to do the job. If you need to spread the job out over many months, consider using a product like Certainteed DiamondDeck. It's tough and can be exposed for about 6 months if needed where tar paper will wrinkle up the first time it gets wet or will rip off the roof during the first big breeze.
 
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