Shingle Starter Strip Roll overlap strips at rake/eave

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Old 09-03-13, 10:53 AM
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Shingle Starter Strip Roll overlap strips at rake/eave

Roofing a small shed - using a starter shingle roll...the picture in the instructions aren't totally clear to me...does the starter roll overlap where the rake and eave meet? If not which way is best to trim where they meet, seam vertical like the tabs on a shingle, or horizontal?
 
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Old 09-03-13, 04:02 PM
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Ice and Water shield has a continuous adhesive backing and is much wider than the starter roll and should be used for the rake. As far as the starter strip, you will nail on your first row of shingles and the glue strip will be re-set on the first row and not be lost to the rake row, so I would not worry about any overlap issues. The water shield up the rake may be overkill on a shed unless that shed is going to be conditioned space where heat loss can cause water dams to create at the eaves.
 
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Old 09-03-13, 05:05 PM
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If you are intent on using it as you have suggested, do it just like you have it drawn, overlapped.

Using ice and water along the bottom edge is code around here, but like you said, its a shed.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 06:31 PM
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I personally don't care much for roll roofing, but if I understand you question.
Starting at the rake, put the bottom strip along the eave first, as shown in the diagram with the sealant strip near the bottom or eave.
Then put the roll along the rake, starting at the eave and rolling up to the ridge with the sealant strip near the edge of the rake, on both sides of the roof.
Then roll out the next strip to completely cover the eave starter and cover over the bottom portion of the two rake starters.
As you go up, put down the roll from rake to rake, completely covering the two "rake" starters.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 07:13 PM
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Mister Ed, I don't think he is using roll roofing. Just a roll of starter strip for his shingles.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 07:38 PM
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My error, if he is merely using the roll roofing for a starter strip for shingles.
And my apology for the error for which I can give no excuse other than that I have never thought to use roll roofing as a starter strip on a shingle roof.
I always use, or used, either all shingles or all roll roofing for the entire job, and rarely used roll roofing for any pitch greater than a 2.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 07:55 PM
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It's not really roll roofing at all.... It's a roll of starter, comes in a small 8" x 8" x 8" box... the roll is about 8" wide and 33 ft long with a sticky tar strip on one side.

No worries, have fun on the forums. There have been a lot of interesting topics tonite.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 09:57 PM
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You see now, that just shows a bit of my ignorance about some things.
I helped roof my first house when I was five, toting two shingles at a time up that extension ladder, and that was 55 years ago.
Just never had any reason to use the roll starter strips cause I was too accustomed to the do it yourself starters that the roofer I first helped used.
I would assume that they install pretty much the same way, across the eave, then up the rake with the bottom overlapping to the eave, and top overlapping the ridge by 12 to 18 inches.
I still hate that roll roofing that I originally thought was the subject.
 
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Old 09-04-13, 10:06 PM
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LOL, me too. Too many nails!
 
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Old 09-06-13, 06:51 AM
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I'm just to lazy to cut the tabs off

Seriously though, I do have another question about this....

If I run the starter shingle roll up the rake edge as shown, shouldn't the shingles overhang the rake starter a bit?

Wouldn't having them even with the rake starter pose a risk of the starter catching water and allowing it to get back under the shingles (like having exposed drip edge stick out from under the shingles)?

Or am I just overthinking this???

Wouldn't have this problem on the eaves, because it's the lowest point.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 07:00 AM
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The shingles should extend maybe 1/2" beyond the drip edge.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 10:22 AM
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I use the first knuckle of my index finger to measure the overhang when I put down shingles along any edge, rake or eave, which gives about an inch overhang.
And yes that would be overhanging the starter.
And I would suggest "no less" than a half inch overhang.
And don't assume that just because the eave is the lowest point, that the overhang is less important.
Have you ever looked at the effect of water cascading over a water fall?
Notice the cavern that is caused by the water roll back when the water goes over the edge.
When water goes over an edge, such as the bottom of a shingle at the eave, some of it swirls backward, and if the drop off or edge of the shingle is too close to the structure, then that swirl "can" enter beneath the shingle.
But too much overhang "can" leave a lip that strong winds can catch and lift the shingle off the roof.
Staples in shingles are cheaper, but in my opinion are garbage, because the staple is more likely to tear through in strong winds than headed roofing nails are.
And now I'm off subject.
 
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Old 09-06-13, 08:28 PM
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My practice is to use the overlap specified by the shingle manufacturer. Should be stated somewhere right on the bundle wrappers.

By far the best way to get any manufacturer warranty satisfaction, installing them the exact way they tell you to.

And, Mr. Ed, staples are not allowed by both the IRC and many state residential building codes. But cheapo roofers still like to use them, because they save a few $$$ on a typical roof.
 
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Old 09-09-13, 03:27 PM
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Thanks All!

All total, I have an overhang of about 3/4 inch...I went with the starter shingles vs. the starter roll (seemed to thin and flimsy). Looks way better than my last shed and I'm sure it will hold up better.

I went 13 years without even using a starter course on my last shed....I had problems once with a heavy wind, luckily not much worse than that!
 
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