Metal roof flashing

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Old 09-29-13, 12:09 AM
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Metal roof flashing

So, I'm looking to replace my asphalt roof with a metal one soon. It is already 15yrs old and has been repaired multiple times already. We have fixed all the missing/damaged shingles to date but the roof really is starting to show its age. I'm at a point where I'm reluctant to put money into the interior of the house until the roof is replaced.

We have a brick chimney which the oil burner exhausts into. It is flashed with lead. I have spoken with 5 roofing companies. Multiple companies said they would replace my lead flashing and tuck the metal roofing material between the bricks in the chimney. The others said my lead flashing still looked good and would not replace it, Only one company explained to me that lead near the metal roof could cause failure due to dissimilar metals.

I understand that dissimilar metals should not be placed near each other so to me that seemed like a valid statement. Is this even a concern with a metal roofs and lead flashing?

This company was also the only company that said they would not add snow stops around vents or gutters. The response was that they use lag bolts for their gutters and replace my cheap vents with stronger vents. Their quote wasn't the highest or the lowest. I'm just not sure if about all their answers.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 05:01 AM
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I'm not an expert when it comes to metal roofing or how dissimilar metals react but in the old days all the metal [steel] roofs were installed using lead head nails. The only issue I've ever seen with lead head nails is over time when the nail backs out a little and there is movement with the roof - sometimes the lead 'washer' will break and fall off. I used to paint a lot of old metal roofs and never saw any corrosion where the lead head and roofing meet. Let's wait and see what some of the roofers have to say
 
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Old 09-29-13, 05:08 AM
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Lag bolts to hold gutters on!
Why not hidden gutter hangers?
 
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Old 09-29-13, 10:26 PM
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Thanks for the response. Based on your response it sounds like the lead near the metal roof shouldn't be a problem.

As a secondary question, I'd like to gutter the entire house with seamless gutters. I've received quotes to gutter only the entry ways and the entire roof. The real expense is in the snow stops (S-5 brackets). I have a 12/12 pitch roof with two dormers (cape). Not much snow stays on the roof now with shingles. I'm looking at a mechanically seamed standing seam metal roof with hidden fasteners. The metal roof would be installed over the existing shingles that are 15 yrs old.

I'm willing to pay the money for the gutters (and snow stops) but one company (different company) discouraged me from guttering the entire roof stating that I would trap snow on the roof and it could provide the water a chance to penetrate the seams in the metal roof. Is this really something to worry about with today's metal roofs?
 
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Old 09-30-13, 05:13 AM
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We don't get a lot of snow in tenn but with my metal house roof [4.5/12 pitch] which only has a gutter over the front entrance and my low pitched barn roof which has gutter on one complete side - I've never had any issues with leaks from snow backing up on the roof. My roof is the old 5v crimp style and is about 20 yrs old.

Pics might be helpful - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html It might also be helpful to know what region/state you live in.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 03:59 PM
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I believe the reason the guy mentioned it is because the snow brake / stop brackets would have to be placed right above the eaves across the entire length of the front and back of the house which would essentially stop the snow from sliding off the roof or taking out the gutters.

I've attached both a front and back view. Both pictures are from years ago so the roof is not nearly in the same shape now. But, they work to show how my roof is. Oh and yes I did replace that shingle missing in the back.

EDIT: I'm in central Maine.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 09:16 PM
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If it were mine, there would be gutters installed everywhere, just to keep roof runoff out of the basement. When I lived in Colorado, a snow country gutter was popular, which flipped over when the snow was heavy enough, but then rotated back into place (without being torn from the roof). I remember them being a bit pricey, and I don't recall the brand name.

P.S. You could enhance both the appearance and practicality of your (already nice-looking) home by installing small, gabled overhangs above all of the exterior doors. Tying into the roof (front and rear, side would just project from the wall), they could be built to match the upper floor window gables, and would keep rain and snow away from all of your entry doors. Now would be the time to do it, before the metal roof goes on.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 10:23 PM
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If it were mine, there would be gutters installed everywhere, just to keep roof runoff out of the basement. When I lived in Colorado, a snow country gutter was popular, which flipped over when the snow was heavy enough, but then rotated back into place (without being torn from the roof). I remember them being a bit pricey, and I don't recall the brand name.
Those gutters would be cool and would probably negate the need for most of the snow brakes. I'm not sure if that is even in my budget right now. I guess I'll find out soon since the appraiser came by this morning.

We've done some upgrades since the picture. We've had so many water problems with this house that I really want to put my money into the roof and gutters. The back porch is attached to the house but floating on blocks. It was never flashed. Yeah, we had water pouring into our kitchen shortly after we bought the place. We replaced the door and some of the rot (porch was never detached) and flashing was added. Hasn't leaked since but eventually I want to pull the porch away, replace the door again (HATE the slider), fix any structure that was compromised and set the porch in concrete footings if attaching it again or leave it detached on blocks.

P.S. You could enhance both the appearance and practicality of your (already nice-looking) home by installing small, gabled overhangs above all of the exterior doors. Tying into the roof (front and rear, side would just project from the wall), they could be built to match the upper floor window gables, and would keep rain and snow away from all of your entry doors. Now would be the time to do it, before the metal roof goes on.
Just to confirm, you are referring to something like the attached picture?

That would be really cool too. I had never really considered that. It would probably look pretty good too. I wouldn't do it on the side near the driveway only because I'd like to build a garage and adjoining mud room eventually.

It's all really up to the appraisal at this point (and I'm nervous).
 
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Old 10-01-13, 12:00 AM
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Yes, exactly like the photo. If you eventually go ahead with the attached garage plan, I strongly suggest you go with a gable roofed structure, oriented perpendicular to the main house's gable and connected to it with a short breezeway. Doing so would prevent dumping tons of snow on the driveway (from the roof) in front of the garage door. Trust me, it's no fun having to move the stuff out of the way to get the vehicle(s) in or out of the garage in winter.
 
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Old 10-01-13, 08:05 PM
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Hi Kris,

I have to agree with BridgeMan. Nice design as well. Go with the second option
 
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Old 10-02-13, 02:48 PM
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Well the Gabled overhangs above the doors are out of the question right now. I agree they would look great but the appraisal came back and the bank called me today. We have just enough equity to do the roof and gutters but not enough to do any other work at this time. The bank actually agreed to raise their Loan-to-value limit (from 90 to 93%) on the loan to get us enough to complete the roof otherwise we would have been short. I guess having good credit helps from time to time.

Thanks for all the responses. I plan on moving forward with the metal roof and continuous seamless gutters across the entire house.
 
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