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Remedies for ridge cap shingles incorrectly installed at rake?

Remedies for ridge cap shingles incorrectly installed at rake?

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Old 03-10-14, 03:18 PM
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Remedies for ridge cap shingles incorrectly installed at rake?

I have a small patio attached to the garage and it has a shingle roof. That roof has ridge cap shingles installed along the roof rake. However these ridge cap shingles seem to have been incorrectly installed and the roof deck becomes wet at the edges, along the rakes.

If I understand correctly, when installing these ridge cap shingles along the rake, the ridge cap shingles need to be interleaved with the regular horizontal shingles, row by row. In other words, as you shingle the roof, you need to install a ridge cap shingle at the rake every time you lay a new row of the regular shingles. That way the ridge cap shingles are interleaved into each shingle row, like step flashing.

But, whoever installed this roof (may have been DIY) seems to have first put down all the horizontal shingles on the roof deck, and then, installed the ridge cap shingles at the rakes as a completely add on layer. As you can imagine, with this layout, any water that makes it between the regular shingles layer and the ridge cap shingle layer eventually finds its way onto the roofs wood sheathing.

Is there a way to remedy this?

This is a house my parents bought recently, and this roofing was probably done 5-10 years ago. Having been exposed to the hot California sun, the shingles are well glued together.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 03:57 PM
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Any way to post pictures of this? It is common to install starter shingles on the rake edge, but there should not be any way for water to infiltrate under the shingles, as they should protrude past the starters. I doubt that they are ridge shingles. If so, they are incorrectly installed. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
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Old 03-10-14, 06:06 PM
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I have never in my life heard of installing hip and ridge cap shingles anywhere but on the "hip and ridge".

If you are using the wrong term and you are really talking about the "hip", the hip and ridge shingles are always installed LAST, after all the shingles are applied. The hip and ridge shingles go on top of the shingles, they do not get "woven" into each course.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 07:13 PM
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I probably used some wrong terms in my description.

I dont have a picture, but it is like the shingles shown installed at the rake in this picture:

 
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Old 03-10-14, 08:33 PM
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Huh. Must be a California thing to make the detail look like Spanish Tile. Never seen that around here!

Well, I have no idea what brand your shingles might be, but you can see the instructions for similar shingles HERE, and they are installed just like any other hip and ridge. (after the shingles, not woven WITH the shingles.)
 
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Old 03-11-14, 04:29 AM
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Wow. Me neither. I can see how they catch water, especially driven rain. Shingles are apparently cut flush to rake edge, so any water that enters that space could possibly capillary under the shingles. A little too artsy fartsy for the south.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 06:20 AM
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As you can see on the rake going up from left to right there are 16 rows of shingles and only 12 of the cap shingles along the rake, so those are not woven in.

My guess would be a lack of proper flashing on the rake edge before your decorative edge cap was applied.

Bud
 
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Old 03-11-14, 06:41 AM
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Good word choice Bud. Decorative.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 12:41 PM
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I can see how they catch water, especially driven rain. Shingles are apparently cut flush to rake edge, so any water that enters that space could possibly capillary under the shingles.

Yes, that is exactly what I was trying to describe, and that is what must be happening on my installation. There is not enough water seeping through for the roof to leak, but the first foot or two of deck along the rake is damp and water stained. The wet portion widens as you move down the rake, consistent with capillary action along the rake. The decking is not really damaged yet, but as I said, this must be a 5 year old job, rather recent.

That picture I posted comes up at the GAF website. So it should not be that unusual. The installation instructions in XSleepers link suggest the same installation, where, as I see it, capillary action would take some water onto the roof deck. Rake flashing might reduce the effect but not completely eliminate it. Capillary action could still wick some water between the regular shingle layer and the flashing, even though water would have to also capillary a few inches further over the flashing to reach the decking.

I suppose I could try to remedy this by sealing the regular shingle/decorative shingle interface with some roof adhesive/filler ? I guess its just a porch, I dont really care about small leaks, I just dont want the sheathing to rot. Its not a big roof, about 8x35 so the two rakes are only 8 long.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 01:53 PM
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The picture in this link illustrates a capillary break built into the overlap on a metal roof. If you were to add flashing along the edge, creating a lip on the shingle side that provides a small air gap would prevent water from wicking past. Surprised we don't see more of this technique with siding and shingles.
http://www.constructionscience.org/p...ap%20Seams.pdf

Bud
 
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Old 03-11-14, 04:20 PM
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Roof

The shingles are installed correctly, there just wasnt' the right amount of flashing put underneath the edge. You just have to take the shingles up that are working as an edge cap, and put the proper flashing, and then recap them. Of course, you have to make sure you know what you are doing when putting the cap back on. If you don't you need to hire someone that does.

Don't just hire someone that is a roofer. You need to go to friends and family that have had similar work done, and then get the name of their roofing contractor. There is a certain way you flash the eves and overhangs when you cap it like that, and not all of them know how.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 05:11 PM
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Of course, you have to make sure you know what you are doing when putting the cap back on. If you don't you need to hire someone that does.

Can this special installation be described in a few words?
 
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Old 03-12-14, 08:18 PM
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Is there a way to remove these decorative shingles? After 5 years they are pretty glued together.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 09:27 PM
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A good whack under the tar strip with a hammer and prybar usually does it. But I have on occasion actually cut them apart with a reciprocating saw and a 12" blade. LOL Of course, that was only one time - I was doing a repair on a roof where it was absolutely the only thing I could do to get them apart and save them. It was priceless. LOL
 
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