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Hip Roof Addition question! how to tie up to existing roof? Need Help Please!

Hip Roof Addition question! how to tie up to existing roof? Need Help Please!

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  #1  
Old 04-01-14, 09:26 PM
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Hip Roof Addition question! how to tie up to existing roof? Need Help Please!

Hello everyone! I'm building an addition to our home but im having problems on how to tye up to the existing roof. I need some help on designing how to tie up to the existing roof. Its a Hip Roof, , on the left top (on the pic) is where our Laundry room is (the part that "sticks out of the house"). So as you can see, the roof on the top of my laundry room where it meets the house, I'd have to connect to the addition(red part of the draw). How could I do this? If anyone could give me any ideas it would be greatly appreciated!,, thanks in Advance!!



http://i709.photobucket.com/albums/w...v27/MyRoof.jpg
 
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Old 04-01-14, 09:29 PM
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By the way! The numbers you see in the pics are the measurements in ft of the roof, and not the house!! Thanks again!!!:thumbup:
 
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Old 04-01-14, 10:22 PM
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Unless you want to cover it with a flat rubber roof there is only one option that I can see. Hold onto your hat, it's major.

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Old 04-02-14, 08:04 PM
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Wow, not what i was looking to hear... but i appreciated, theres gotta be another way... im just
Really not experienced with roof designing.. anyone else has any ideas? TIA!
 
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Old 04-02-14, 08:38 PM
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Rob, what is your objective as to appearance? XSleeper's suggestion will show a small gable peak in the front. If you want to avoid that and maintain the same basic appearance, then I'm thinking a "mansard" approach. This would yield a rectangular center section either flat or with a very low pitch. It could be a gable or hip in the back.

But, that's a lot of roof work as well. Unfortunately, much less and it will really look like a patch job and could affect the value of the home.

Bud
 
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Old 04-03-14, 10:37 AM
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I vote for Sleeper's idea--it will look good, and not like some hack job.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 11:18 AM
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If you talk to a truss mfg (most lumber yards) they can come out and do the drawings so you get a kit of trusses that go up rather easily.

The lumber yard might also have some other ideas. You can do a low slope off of the back roof that may not be real visible, but my mind jumps back to a home something like that and it just never looked right.

Bud
 
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Old 04-03-14, 11:41 AM
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Rob, it's really not as complicated as you imagine. To get an idea of how it would go, you would lay a couple long boards flat on your left and right hip roofs in front until they meet at the middle. You'd mount a 2x4 to the side of them, down about 14" or so. One end of a nice long 2x10x32' LVL ridge board would rest on top of that board. You'd do something similar on the other end... maybe resting the top of the ridge board on the top rung of a long extension ladder, just to hold it up in the air. The ridge would obviously need to be level, and it would probably be parallel to the other ridge board on the right of your picture. Center it left and right as best you can by measuring to the left roof edge and right roof edge and center it back and forth on your 2x4 and ladder as best as you can by eyeballing it, or plumb down with your chalk box... don't worry about the length right away since you can cut it off later.

Any rafters that go from the new ridge to that old ridge on the right would theoretically all be the same length if they were parallel, so you would probably install one on each end next. Theoretically the rafters that go from the ridge to the left side of your new addition should also be the same length, if both are level and parallel... so you would install one on each end of that section next, and square them by measuring the diagonals. That would basically establish the framework of the roof and the exact location of the ridge. Everything else would just be measuring lengths, cutting angles and filling in the rafters. The tricky ones will be the ones on the left side that have to sit on top of the old hip roof. They'll be compound angles. But you can do it. That's why we're here, to try and answer any questions you encounter along the way.
 
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Old 04-03-14, 12:06 PM
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Here is a 2nd option. It won't look too bad, since the cricket won't be able to be seen from the ground by hardly anyone. I can't say it's any more simple to frame, it's just another option. It also creates some flashing nightmares because that cricket will be draining a large area of the roof and there will be a lot of water all funnelling down to that one point. I would suggest EPDM on the cricket roof simply because it will probably be fairly low slope, and also because EPDM is the easiest way to seal up nightmarish terminations like that one.
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Here is a 3rd option, but it's probably just as complicated as the first option, if not more so.
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The problem isn't so much the roof framing, since there are at least 2 good ways to do it that aren't goofy. The problem is that it sounds like you are entering this project only thinking about where the addition is going and how big you want it to be without giving much thought to what is involved and how the roof will need to be done.

I think after seeing the other options, option 1 will look pretty good.
 
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