Water in yard

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Old 04-20-14, 03:48 PM
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Water in yard

I have a house that is on a high wAter table I was told. The yard in spring is soggy. What are some ideas of fixing this issue.
 
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Old 04-20-14, 04:03 PM
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I'm afraid we're going to need more information than that to be able to help much. Aside from that it's mostly common sense stuff. Water flows downhill. Low areas will collect water. Surface grading by filling in low areas and creating ditches or channels for water to flow can help a lot. If you are in a low lying area where the ground water is naturally near the surface it can be a very difficult situation unless you embrace that type of environment otherwise you are fighting Mother Nature which is usually not cheap and not easy.
 
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Old 04-20-14, 04:19 PM
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It apparently dries out after spring. And it is the lowest yard in the neighborhood. I was wandering if there was a way to divert the water somewhere further back in the yard.
 
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Old 04-21-14, 01:32 AM
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that guy, dane, is right on top of things, huh ? downhill ? yep, same here in ga,,, we're @ the btm of the hill & catch n-bor's runoff who collects it from the 3 n-bors higher up the street

i have jose, juan, & george put a swale thru the back yard,,, 25' uphill of that, they dug another 1

seems to work well enough so far but can't get the wtr to run uphill yet

oddly enough, they said wtr runs downhill in mexico, too we have a customer in a town home - same thing there AND his native kafiristan - go figger !
 
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Old 04-21-14, 06:49 AM
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Again, water flows downhill and "YES" there is a way to send the water further in your back yard. Make the area further back lower in elevation. You can do that by lowering the area further back or by raising the area you want to dry. You still have not provided pictures or a drawing of the area so it's hard to give specifics without knowing what you have.

The big problem comes down to where you send your water. It is generally not legal to change the natural direction of water especially in relation to your neighbors. It is generally illegal for you to dig a ditch and direct the water onto your neighbors property. They may sue you saying you diverted the water and caused a water problem in their yard. If your yard is where water naturally wants to collect then you must proceed with caution as changing the flow of water can involve permits and other legal issues.
 
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Old 04-21-14, 09:51 AM
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Thanks for the advise I will definetly try a few of the things you mentioned.
 
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Old 04-21-14, 12:33 PM
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The key is to not direct the water onto someone else's property and cause a problem. Search the DIY forum enough and you'll find that every couple months someone is having trouble because their neighbor re-graded or added pipes to their downspouts and is sending water onto their property.
 
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Old 04-22-14, 01:48 AM
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in city of atl, there's a rqd 'stormwater runoff permit' for exterior landscape disturbance - i suspect atlantans aren't the only 1's living under that municipal/city regulation, either,,, IF 1 wishes to change anything that might affect said subject, our law says: permit ( $250) + time rqd to find a place to park, find the (&%@^*) dept, wait in line, more waiting while clerk ( finishes hair, gossip, coffee, etc ), submit drawings by a licensed pe/landscape arch, city inspection before, during, AND after work did i mention topographical survey, too ?

to anyone esp us ( waterproofing company ), that adds over $ 1,000 to an exterior dig 'n' coat project just like taxing corporations, we don't pay - its the client's $ burden in the end

not only does working w/o permits endanger our pro license, it exposes us to criminal charges together w/usual civil penalties/liabilities should we create/exacerbate drainage issues/effects GI2
 
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Old 04-22-14, 05:30 AM
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Calm down the stadry. I'm not gonna go and hold this crazy water drainage system that will ruin the world forever. Thinking maybe some medication for you, you're a little to hyped up.
 
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