Need opinions on drip edge and wrapping wooden fascia


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Old 07-02-14, 07:38 PM
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Need opinions on drip edge and wrapping wooden fascia

We moved into a new home a few months ago. The house is a beautiful cedar sided home with what looks to be a cedar 1x6 as the fascia board. The gutters wrap the entire house with what seams to be plenty of downspouts, and no trees around to clog them up with leaves. After a few heavy rainstorms, I noticed the mulch and dirt directly under the gutters around the house looked like water had been dripping into it. I went out during the next rain event, and low and behold there's a decent amount of water dripping between the fascia board and the gutter.

After inspection, the house has no ice/water drip edge. The shingles just overhang the gutter a little bit, but I assume capillary/cohesion action of water is allowing it to run uphill and hit the fascia, then come down behind the gutter.

My plan is to ask a local gutter/fascia/soffit contractor for a quote to remove the gutter, wrap the fascia with aluminum, install the drip edge, and re-install the gutter.

Does this sound reasonable, and if so, any shot in the dark on how much $$ this might set me back?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!
 
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Old 07-02-14, 07:43 PM
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You should be able to just slip gutter apron over the gutters and under the shingles without doing the rest. I'd suggest a roofer for that, but if you wanted to DIY, it would be about $0.50/ft for the materials.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 07:48 PM
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I don't think I've seen a gutter apron, but I'll look them up. Would the fascia still eventually rot up by going that route? The house is about 10 years old, and I assume it's had this problem since day 1. There are a few spots where the fascia looks green, from mildew/mold I assume.

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:03 PM
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Cedar is more resistant to decay than some other species, but like almost any wood it will eventually rot if it keeps getting wet... gutter apron will solve 99.9% of the problem, though.

If the wood is bare and unpainted... it's possible that something more should be done.

Here's a picture of gutter apron, which is a specific kind of drip edge. I like how in the picture, the guy is putting more gutter apron on top of existing gutter apron, because the gutter guys were so stupid that they didn't tuck the gutters UNDER it. Duh.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:05 PM
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I assume that the fascia board has received the same coatings as the house, and I'm guessing in 10 years maybe the house has gotten stain/sealer twice? I guess a good power washing would tell if there's any rot starting under the green mildew look. That's only in a couple of localized places...everywhere else I think it's good to go. Thanks for your input!
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:10 PM
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Yeah, misting the wood with a garden sprayer and a little bleach/water mixture followed by a power washing (prior to the next coat of finish) will usually clean the wood up.

But go easy on the bleach and don't use a high pressure tip, since cedar is soft, it will actually blow away the top layers of the wood if you're not careful.
 
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Old 07-02-14, 08:15 PM
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Sounds good. Thanks for all the advice. I'll check with my local guy for a price on the apron work and see where this goes...

Thanks again.
 
 

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