Rotted window sill question...


  #1  
Old 12-13-14, 05:10 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Rotted window sill question...

I have a rotted window sill where about 20% of it is all rotted away in one corner; part of the bottom of the side trim is rotted as well.

How can I cover them up, or temporarily fix them to get me through the winter until I can fix them properly in the spring? I don't want water to get in there and get into the wall.
 
  #2  
Old 12-13-14, 06:16 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,276
Received 1,534 Votes on 1,378 Posts
Pump a tube of caulk into the void and sculpt it with something flat.
 
  #3  
Old 12-14-14, 04:33 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
You also could possibly replace just the sill nosing and brick mold in the same time it would take to fix it temporarily. The side casing can also be repaired using epoxy materials such as Bondo.
 
  #4  
Old 12-14-14, 06:48 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the reply. But isn't it too cold for that to dry properly? It's in the 20's and night and 30's during the day here. I think it has to be warmer than that for it to dry? Also, would I be able to remove that easily when I go to replace or repair the sill?
 
  #5  
Old 12-14-14, 06:50 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
If it is too cold for the caulking, you can use the epoxy/bondo. It cures chemically and produces its own heat as it cures. If you are going to replace it all, then pretty isn't necessary for short term.
 
  #6  
Old 12-14-14, 06:51 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Also, I can't replace the sill properly now because it's too cold to prime, paint, and caulk everything...
 
  #7  
Old 12-14-14, 06:57 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey chandler... thanks for the tips. (I haven't figured out how to quote replies on this forum).

I was just thinking, would spray foam work to seal it up until spring? I would think I would be able to remove/cut it away when I go to fix it later...
 
  #8  
Old 12-14-14, 07:03 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
NO. Spray foam is porous and will let water go past. Good for insulation, but exposed to the elements, not so good.
In order to quote, just copy what you want to quote, click on the quote cloud on the right side of the bar above, then remove all the reference data leaving everything in the middle between the {QUOTE} marks. But no real need to quote things closely associated with your next post. Only if it gets separated, or if it is really important to emphasize a point.
 
  #9  
Old 12-14-14, 07:05 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks man. So no spray foam... somehow covering it with plastic probably wouldn't work either as it probably wouldn't seal 100%...
 
  #10  
Old 12-14-14, 07:07 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
Right. Pop for the bondo, mix it up (2 parts), apply it as smooth as possible. It also expands as it heats up, so it is good for such repairs.
 
  #11  
Old 12-14-14, 07:11 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool, I will look into that... thanks man!
 
  #12  
Old 12-14-14, 07:13 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,964
Received 9 Votes on 8 Posts
We're here. Let us know when you get ready to do the real work. Post pictures so we can see what you see, and it will make our advice better in the spring, when it gets warmer.
 
  #13  
Old 12-14-14, 07:21 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Cool, i will definitely post some pics...
 
  #14  
Old 12-14-14, 10:24 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
If you do decide to repair it correctly now, you can prime the wood inside and install it after it dries. Depending on how far north you are, you can still do exterior painting but you have to watch the weather and pick your days
 
  #15  
Old 12-14-14, 03:35 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 29,276
Received 1,534 Votes on 1,378 Posts
Solvent based caulk can be applied. in almost any temperature.

OSI Quad would be an example. Vulkem is another. Since you said its a temporary fix, that seems to be the obvious choice.
 
  #16  
Old 12-14-14, 04:31 PM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If you do decide to repair it correctly now, you can prime the wood inside and install it after it dries. Depending on how far north you are, you can still do exterior painting but you have to watch the weather and pick your days
I was thinking something like that too, but not sure if it's doable, as I may not have the time the one day it hits 45...

Solvent based caulk can be applied. in almost any temperature.

OSI Quad would be an example. Vulkem is another. Since you said its a temporary fix, that seems to be the obvious choice.
Cool, maybe I can just it all in with that to keep the water out for the winter...
 
  #17  
Old 12-15-14, 08:29 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Here is a pic of the window:
Name:  window.jpg
Views: 205
Size:  41.9 KB
 
  #18  
Old 12-15-14, 09:23 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 49,254
Received 681 Votes on 602 Posts
If it were me, I'd cut and prime new wood, maybe even apply 1 coat of finish [all indoors] and then install it. The problem with using any kind of filler is where do you stop removing the bad? If you just patch what is missing, it won't be long before the surrounding wood falls out
 
  #19  
Old 12-15-14, 09:55 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If it were me, I'd cut and prime new wood, maybe even apply 1 coat of finish [all indoors] and then install it. The problem with using any kind of filler is where do you stop removing the bad? If you just patch what is missing, it won't be long before the surrounding wood falls out
Well, when I do it properly in the spring I plan to cut out the rotted part by making a square cut, possibly using some wood hardener and filler in the open areas, then putting in new pieces of wood, getting them as close as possible to the existing wood, then caulking the seems....
 
  #20  
Old 12-16-14, 08:55 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 488
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Rotted window sill and trim

Consider replacing the sill and trim with PVC....will not rot. Also, if you're brave and want to do it now the PVC does not have to be painted and there are caulks that can be applied in low temperatures to seal the joints. I've had good luck with AZEK brand PVC...done a lot of window sills, corner trim boards. Not cheap but good stuff and easy to cut and shape. I had rotten sills and trim boards that look like yours. I used MinWax wood filler (works and hardens like Bondo) initially but eventually had to replace entire boards.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: