Painting above an attached patio cover.


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Old 03-23-15, 10:56 PM
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Painting above an attached patio cover.

Soon to be painting second story. Previous owners installed the alumawood Newport non-insulated patio. The pans (roof) are really thin and interlock. Typically used for shade. We need to get on the roof to paint. For all I know the ledger is mounted to the wall by wood screws. Ruled out cherry picker because we cannot get it into the backyard. Don't want to take apart each individual pan one by one. Don't trust a 3/4 thick plywood unless it is supported by a heavy duty jack stand (tripod jack stand) to sandwich the pans with planks. Any other ideas?
 
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Old 03-23-15, 11:18 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

I have a similar patio cover and I use 2) 2x10's with 3) 4x4 posts. There is not much else you can do. I don't trust the ledger bracket completely either.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 03:51 AM
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Welcome to the forums Joe!

could you post some pics - http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html

Generally it's best to not get on those types of roofs and there are work arounds. When you must get on the roof it's best to lay a 2x12 across the roof and then support it with lumber scotched beneath it [from the slab to the underside of the roof]
 
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Old 03-24-15, 11:21 AM
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Here are a few pics.
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Old 03-24-15, 01:20 PM
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I only see one picture but it does look nice
 
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Old 03-24-15, 01:36 PM
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To better assess what you have and the best way to access above it we need a pic from farther back that shows both the patio roof and that side of the house.
 
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Old 03-24-15, 01:39 PM
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IMO you would have no problem laying a couple sheets of 3/4 plywood down and working on top of that, provided you limited the number of people up there to one. I have built several of these rooms/covers before and those roofs are stronger than you think. A picture of the top of the roof would help confirm that.
 
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Old 03-25-15, 02:59 PM
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roof

More to come in a few more days. Please bare with me.
 
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Last edited by Joethai; 03-25-15 at 03:29 PM. Reason: photo
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Old 03-25-15, 06:24 PM
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Yeah that's exactly what I pictured. I'm 180 lbs and never had ANY problem on a roof like that as long as a sheet of plywood was spreading the weight out. When you think about it, a 4x8 sheet is 32 sq ft, so that's less than 6 lbs of weight per sq ft.

Now I suppose rooms in Arizona aren't rated for a whole lot of snow load but the panning looks almost exactly the same as covers that I've put up, and we can get a lot up here, and it holds it just fine. It would obviously make sense to lay the plywood down and stay as close to the walls and beams of the room as possible rather than just walking right out across the middle unnecessarily.
 
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Old 03-26-15, 04:09 AM
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We have a lot of similar patio roofs here in the southeast, some are fairly stout and others are scary. I have been on some where a 2x12 scotched from below made me leery.

Sometimes you can avoid getting on the roof by using extension poles both for the roller and the brush. They make a brush 'holder' that clamps onto the brush handle and screws onto the roller pole. It's a little more difficult to brush that way but it is a handy tool. I have laid on the roof and reached over to do the cut in work.
 
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Old 03-26-15, 09:28 AM
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New answer by original installer

Hello folks. Recently I was lucky to hear from the person who installed the patio many years ago. This gentleman went to look at the metal patio recently in our backyard. He called me. After I told him what I was doing he answered by saying “I do not need to remove the pans so I can access the upper half of the house”. He also said ”what need to do is take a ˝” or ľ” plywood two feet in width and place it on top of the roof (pans) and flush up against the house. Two feet no more (length wise as much as you need) and no one over 200lbs. distribute the weight. No need to place a support system underneath”. Thank you for your responses. Next up pool stuff..
 
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Old 03-26-15, 10:46 AM
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Glad you got it figured out Just be careful on the roof and remember the plywood can scoot if you aren't paying attention
 
 

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