Angled roof channeling water into wall

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Old 05-19-15, 08:29 PM
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Angled roof channeling water into wall

I have this stupid angled roofline that is channeling water behind the siding which is now leaking into my house.
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I installed a kickout under the last step flashing and under the last shingle (I havent put the last piece of siding trim back on). The old kickout was tilted backward into the wall AND had a hole in it. This one functions like it should.
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However, I now believe that water is running down the roofline, at the shingle line, under the kickout and behind the siding. The vertical seam where the roof meets the wall is caulked and is still sealed. So water is most likely going over the top of that seam.
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I need to know how I can seal this off, or how I should tear this all out and redo it differently. Any help would be hugely appreciated. I'm tired wringing out towels and drying out my floorboard.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 08:36 PM
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Kick out is not even close to being installed right.
Even the shingles have no where near enough over hang.
The J molding is also installed wrong.
https://www.google.com/search?q=kick...ml%3B350%3B373
 
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Old 05-19-15, 09:26 PM
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I assume you also have a kickout flashing on the roof on the left side? Cuz you need one there too. Both roofs will have the tendency to be directing water behind the siding unless flashed properly. Your left roof is probably leaking just like the right side is/was.

Have you unzipped the siding to see if there is housewrap and that it's lapped properly? It shouldn't be leaking into the house... the housewrap should be keeping it outside. So if you remove a piece of siding and it's wet behind the housewrap, remove the next piece and the next, until it's dry. Then fix it right.

One thing I notice that could be done better is that your kickout has been overlapped the wrong way. The cut you made... where you folded the kickout... you have the bottom lapping over the top, which will catch water. The bottom half should fold UNDER the top half. Everything needs to be lapped shingle style to shed water.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 09:30 PM
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I didn't install the shingles or jchannel. Just the kick out. It sits flush against the wall. It's preformed, not much I can do about the angle it comes out at. About the only adjustment I can do to it is to put it higher up on the roofline so less of it overhangs.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 09:37 PM
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The kick out is welded at the seam I didn't make this one. The left roof does have a kick out, that roof butts up to the wall perpendicular so water doesn't follow the drip edge down into the wall.

The house is wrapped with a black fabric type paper nothing like tyvek.

It is lapped properly except probably right at the roof joins where the water is obviously getting behind it.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 09:40 PM
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So far the consensus is to rip off the siding, make sure the wrap is correct, fix the kick out with a different style, figure out the jchannel and reside.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 09:56 PM
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All your siding will go right back on, so "ripping off" isn't exactly what I was picturing. In photo 1, you can see 2 rows of siding at the top where each row has a vertical seam. I would suggest unzipping the piece of siding above those short pieces that have the vertical splices. Use a Malco Sideswiper. The piece you unzip can stay on the house, but remove everything below it... at least 4 rows, the way it looks. Once you do that and get down to the housewrap (sounds like Typar) you will probably be able to see what needs to be done. You should be able to put those same 4 pc of siding right back where they came from.

My guess is that they probably butchered the WRB around the fascia ends, and that's where water is getting behind the WRB. You may want to use some sort of peel and stick flashing tape to reinforce your WRB in those areas. You can also use a sheet of aluminum trim coil to make a flashing that will fit around & behind the fascia. I like to lay the bottom of that flashing over the nailing fin of the vinyl siding below, so that any water that "does" happen to get in is directed out to the siding weep holes right away. Water is going to run into the siding at the bottom corner of the fascia unless you pump a ton of caulk in there. I prefer to not worry so much about that, and just flash behind the siding in a way that directs the water back out asap. Just be sure you start from the bottom and lap everything correctly, one on top of the next.

And on the left roof, ensure that the end of the j-channel is lapped out onto the kickout. A lot of water dumps out those j-channels.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 10:51 PM
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Yeah I won't rip just zip. Thanks for the suggestion. Once it stops raining for 5 minutes I'll do just that. I live in a freaking desert and all it's been doing this year is rain. I should be thankful for the water but it's not going where I want it.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 08:09 PM
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Well...I'm screwed.
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Tar paper was destroyed at the intersection and exterior cladding is rotten all the way down the side of the house.
This must have been leaking since day one...of 11 years.
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About half way down the wall. And yes, there was no paper at the section between the two roof lines.
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Yep.
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IF, and that is a big IF, If I were to attempt a repair of this on my own, I would assume I would basiclly cut the rotten section out, hope the framing is intact, clean any mold and replace the insulation, somehow seal the seam with tar/asphalt?, re-wrap and flash properly and finally reside?

If I suck it up and pay a contractor to do it, what "type" of contractor do I shop for? General, siding etc?
 
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Old 05-20-15, 08:28 PM
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That doesn't look nearly as bad as I expected. Nothing in the photos looks bad enough to replace... but can't tell how soft it is from the pictures or if it gets much worse on the way down. The repair should be quite easy, and yes you have it about right. Remove your siding, cut back the WRB, leaving a few inches of it on either side. Figure out where the studs are, snap a couple parallel chalk lines, then cut out a section that is hopefully only 16" wide. I would not tear out anything behind the fascia... stay a few inches below it. Since you live in a fairly dry area, you might get lucky. If it is only discolored but still solid, there is no way I would tear it out. I would fix up the WRB the way it should have been and call it a day.

Don't use any tar.

So did you understand what I was saying about using a sheet of aluminum trim coil (or sheet metal) around the fascia? In your last post, first picture, you would remove the j-channels and any caulking and then try to cut the sheet and tuck it up under the soffit and fascia cover as far as you can possibly get it. Having metal there will help protect the sheathing and WRB from damage. The j-channel can go right back on once it's flashed. Then caulk it up again.

Everyone knows vinyl siding lets water behind the siding at locations like this. The thing the installers should have done is done a little extra work to protect that area and kick that water back out over the siding right away with that metal flashing... not just let it run down the house. Also, use something better than felt paper.
 
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Old 05-20-15, 10:28 PM
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The worst of it is up at and behind the fascia. It is very soft there. It is discolored all the way down the wall but gets less and less soft as you go. At some point it is getting behind the sheathing where it then leaks under my baseboards inside (this is how I first started investigating this...hindsight Sucks should have paid more attention to the stained concrete below the siding).

If I had to cut away behind the fascia I guess I'd have to do it from the inside? At the top I bet I could stab a screwdriver through fairly easily. Lower down it would take probably a hammer and screwdriver. Hopefully I can avoid all that.

I suppose I should cut some holes inside to check for mold etc?

I think I get your drift about the flashing behind the fascia. Ideally a square of sheet metal would slide right up behind it, but on top of the WRB? How would you secure it? Nails? And then nail the j channel on top of all that? Or would some sort of cement be better?

Also, why wouldn't you seal the new piece of sheathing at the seams? Breathability?

Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 06:34 AM
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The seams of the sheathing don't need to be sealed. That's what the WRB is for. If it makes you feel better, go ahead, but none of your other seams on the entire house are sealed, so....

Like I said, I wouldn't remove the fascia if at all possible. Big can of worms. You would be into the shingles, soffit, fascia cover... don't do it. Cover it with metal and be done with it. From the looks of it, the problem was all at the bottom corner, so as long as you can get some metal under there an inch or two, you should be good.

If you want other opinions, or if I'm steering you wrong, I'm sure others will chime in.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 09:53 AM
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Appreciate your input.

I'll get some flashing up there and wrap it up. Hopefully it dries out and the rot doesnt spread.
 
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Old 05-21-15, 10:39 PM
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If I understood you correctly, this is what I came up with...for the flashing test fit (the kickout is temporarily removed at the top). This is as far as it will slide in, which as far as I can tell, is just past the rot. The 2x4 it is under looks dry and still solid. I think I might add another two pieces to the mix...since I have them.

What would be a better WRB to lay down (under the flashing, of course) instead of this felt junk? Tyvek?

Also, where would you nail the flashing to keep it in place?
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Old 05-21-15, 10:53 PM
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That's great but you might want to use a much larger piece of sheet metal. (I'm picturing couple pieces that are 12x24... one below that surrounds the V-notch, and one above/notched over the roof extending to the left) It's sold in rolls of various widths. You "could" keep those small ones in place and slide a much larger piece behind that will extend farther left and right. But you really don't want a bunch of seams, so you might end up pulling them out. If you draw around the fascia with a sharpie, you can use them as a pattern for the next larger piece. Or if you decide to leave them, cut a V out of that lower piece and you will be able to slide it up behind those others. If you use a larger piece you can nail it on the left and right ends, a long ways from where any water might want to leak.

Tyvek is good. Its durable. Home Depot sells 4" wide rolls that cost less than a full roll.
 
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