Restoring old detached garage/shed

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Old 07-06-15, 03:41 PM
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Restoring old detached garage/shed

Hi All,

I have this old detached garage (weather zone is 5, so we get snow). It is built using wood siding and shingle roof. The overall structure is ok. The siding is now ok, I fixed already some of the damaged siding. The siding has the felt water protection in between the siding and the studs, but some of it is damaged in between the studs, probably by vermint.

The roof (hipped style) has the rafters in what looks like good condition but the sheeting (Lumber) is rotten. The roof is not flat but has not much inclination either (if I compare it to my house's roof). It is not high either, so I am not concerned over falling or wind problems.

I am trying to recover this garage as a do it yourself project. I have read some over the internet and I think I am ok with the process. So I need help in doing it correctly. So here are my questions:

1. For the inside walls, I removed the drywall as it was wet due to the water coming from the roof. I plan to add new dryawall but I want to water/re-insulate it (from the inside). Since I am not planning to remove the siding to install new felt, Is there anything I can use from the inside to add more water insulation ? Like some kind of paint? Adding more felt paper from the inside would be a good idea?


2. For roofing, I am planning to remove the shingles and remove the rotten planks. I am guessing half of the whole roof.
- should I remove all planks and replace it by boards?
- If replacing only existing planks, would I have issues of the wide of the plank not fitting perfectly ?
- I saw different types of felt, self sticking, attached with nails or attached with clips. Which one is more appropriate ? If you know of good videos/ instructions to do it it would really help me if you point me to them.


Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 07-06-15, 05:44 PM
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Post some pictures so we can see what your seeing.
Roof comes first.
By planks do you really mean 1 X 6's?
Need to see what's holding up that roof.
 
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Old 07-06-15, 07:15 PM
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Ok, here is the garage look:

20150706_195203


Here is the look of the roof from inside:
20150706_195257

another one:

20150706_195245


Look of the walls from inside:

20150706_195327

Hope it helps
 
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Old 07-06-15, 08:09 PM
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Got a mess there.
Siding never should have been installed that close to grade and will always be an issue until it's addressed.
I would have removed the siding at the bottom, installed 1 X 6 PVC lumber, aluminum Z molding then ran the siding.
Using roofing paper under the siding was useless.
If your going to reroof then remove the shingles and go over the whole roof with 1/2" OSB or CDX plywood add a drip edge, roofing felt then shingle.
Add a gutter over that over head door.
 
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Old 07-06-15, 10:04 PM
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Thanks!

To be clear, removing shingles and planks (half of those are roten)...right?
is 1/2 inch Ok for supporting snow?

Lastly do.I need to add a vent? There are none...
 
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Old 07-08-15, 06:16 PM
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Yes 1/2" is sufficient (wouldn't hurt to use plywood clips), and OSB will be 8 or $10 less a sheet than plywood. In fact some home builders in my area still use 7/16 OSB (with clips) on roofs, but I've always pushed 1/2" or 5/8".

And Joe brought up a grade point regarding your siding clearance. Almost any building product (other than PVC) should be kept at least 6" above grade. When left closer you will always have a wicking issue.

As for the vent, you need equal intake and exhaust on the building. Therefore if you can't open any vents at the soffit, the exhaust vents will be useless.....imagine trying to suck air through a straw pinched between your fingers
 
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Old 07-19-15, 07:37 PM
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Thanks!

This is still ongoing I just finished fixing siding and replacing window.

Before doing something else I would like to water profing the walls. What can I do to prevent water liking through the walls? See pictures in previous posting
 
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Old 07-20-15, 05:03 AM
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What is your definition of 'waterproofing the walls'?

The problem with water wicking up thru the siding is the close proximity to the ground. Keeping the area next to the base of the building clear of debris, grass, leaves, etc will help. Ideally you'd remove the bottom portion of the siding and replace with something more water resistant.
 
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Old 07-20-15, 05:30 AM
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A good rain management system is a must. With the short eave on the garage gutters play a vital role in keeping water off the side of the building.
 
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Old 07-20-15, 10:43 AM
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Ideally you'd remove the bottom portion of the siding and replace with something more water resistant.
A row or two of this stuff on the bottom should do the trick.

Fiber Cement Siding - GAF WeatherSide
 
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