Roofing a shed

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Old 08-17-15, 06:31 AM
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Roofing a shed

Just tore down an old lean-to wood shed in the back that lasted about 20 years.

The old shed.



The new one has just been framed in, with 3/4" plywood all around - which I learned later on is not the best material but the old T1-11 was thin and warped badly so I wanted something thicker. In any case it's all in and I need to paint the whole thing over...it's been pouring the last few days so the wood is being soaked.

Here are the newer pictures.









I just realized on the two sides the way I framed it I have a flushed wall with the roof. Not even a little overhang. I wonder if I need to fasten a piece of 2X4 along the top just to have a little bit of overhang so the rain won't be spilling over the sides constantly. Well even with a 2X4 with gives only another 1.5" it probably will anyways. Is it going to help any?

The next question is now that I have a roof deck of an area about 11' wide by 4' deep. What is the best way to roof this? Do I hire a regular roofing company to come put flashing on the back with the concrete wall, drop edge all around, then felt and shingle/metal? or is there a more economical way for sheds like this? A neighbor suggested just flash the back wall and put a shower pan liner over the whole thing.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 06:53 AM
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In apposition of using a false rafter system, installing a 2x4 on the side matching the rafters will at least give some run off protection. Your decking can extend a little beyond that, too. I would use two sheets of decking, cut to where it is equal on both sides (slightly offset due to your rafter positioning). You want to span at least 3 rafters with any sheet goods. Why hire anything done on such a small project? You can do it. You have the technique (with the exception of your neighbor's suggestion) in place. flash the back onto the deck, install drip edge all around, Plytanium or felt, then shingles using 7/8" nails.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 06:53 AM
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What pitch does the roof have? what type of roofing do you intend to use?
 
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Old 08-17-15, 06:58 AM
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I'll have to step back a little on my previous post due to Mark bringing it up. Is that your roof??? If so, it is horribly too low a pitch. I was thinking you would install a roof over this with a pitch. Shingles won't work here.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 09:32 AM
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There is a pitch, about 5" over 4 feet. It looks flat due to the camera angle.

I am open to suggestions in the roof materials.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 01:40 PM
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That is still almost flat. No shingle roof will work with that pitch! I think the only options would be a hot tar roof or maybe metal ..... but I'm a painter not a roofer so wait and see what they say.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 01:53 PM
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Do you have room to add more height at the back so you could increase the pitch?

I don't think you're going to get to a pitch which would allow shingles but any little bit might help.

At this point something metal seems the best option.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 01:55 PM
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I vote on slatting it and installing a metal roof since the pitch is so shallow.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 04:10 PM
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Might consider using mineral surfaced roll roofing.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 04:32 PM
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Way to late to be asking once it's already been built, but there is a way to make lemon aid out of lemon's.
Should have been at least 2 X 6's as a bare minimum to gain some slope.
Now your stuck with having to cut some tapered 2 X 8'S and attach them to the top of the 2 X 4's to gain enough slope.
And add at least 2 X 6's so the over hang on the two outside edge's.
That house wall also will need to be cut with a diamond blade in a ciruler saw or 4-1/2" right angle grinder to be able to slip in the needed Z molding.
 
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Old 08-17-15, 06:03 PM
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Well I pretty much matched the previous footprint & slope, and the old shed lasted over 20 years. I don't necessarily need 20 years out of this, 10 years I am hoping. The 4X4 posts would rot out first.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 04:14 AM
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I'd forget about the slope and go with a flat roofing like metal panels.
 
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Old 08-20-15, 04:42 AM
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You'll need to make sure where the flashing and metal roof intersect is sealed well! While the overhang helps you some, you don't want wind driven rain to get thru
 
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Old 08-20-15, 09:01 PM
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I remeasured and the slope is 12%, so over that 4' depth, the drop is 5.8". A little less than half is under the main house's roof overhang.

 
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Old 08-21-15, 04:53 AM
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If my figuring is right that is about a 1.5/12 pitch. Shingles require a 3/12 minimum. My biggest concern with a metal roof would be sealing the flashing well. While it would be protected from straight falling rain any wind driven rain has the potential to find it's way to the flashing.
 
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Old 08-21-15, 05:38 PM
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With there being that much overhang from the main house's roof/eave as well as the shed roof being that close to the underside of the house's roof I would just use 50 lb. roll roofing with the seam between the upper and lower course being sealed with a swath of roofing cement about four inches wide under the lower edge of the upper course. I probably wouldn't even bother with a head flashing with it being that far back.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 07:04 AM
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I have a blue tarp over it for now secured at the corners with 1X4 scraps until I figure out what to do on the roof. It rained a bit last few days.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 07:10 AM
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marksr I have a painting question as a follow up.

I tried the oil based primer on the wood in a test spot just to see. First, it rained a bit almost every day in South Florida, I understand you have to wait till the wood to dry before painting. However, if it rains every day, how will it be dry? Does it ever gets dry dry? I touched it and it feels dry but I am sure it's not fully dry. If I have to wait till it is truly 100% I might have to wait till December by then the wood would have been warped terribly.

On the test spot I tried the oil based primer, the grain of the wood raised. I assume this is due to the wood being not 100% dry right? So should I wait? Or prime it anyways and sand it smooth before I paint? I plan to use rollers to roll on most of it, then use a brush to fill in the cracks and crevices.
 
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Old 08-22-15, 09:54 AM
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I used to paint in central fla and understand about the rain and the humidity

As long as the wood is dry when the primer is applied the rain won't hurt it much other than to slow down the drying time. Generally if the plywood looks dry - it's ok to prime but if it looks wet - you better wait. All primers raise the grain some, oil base more so than latex. Whether or not to sand the primer is entirely up to you. The odds are if you cover the wood up with your tarp [and it doesn't leak] and then give it a few hours of fresh air it should be ready for the primer.
 
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