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Can my roof be saved, or at least bandaged for another year?

Can my roof be saved, or at least bandaged for another year?

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  #1  
Old 08-29-15, 09:02 PM
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Can my roof be saved, or at least bandaged for another year?

Hello all,

I'm going to be moving in with my girlfriend and her roof appears to be in a state of despair. Our finances are very tight which means having the roof replaced might not be financially Theisable.
Multiple shingles are broken, missing or cracked. In several areas of the roof the shingles are raised and bubbling up (sort of like a cooking pizza).


I'm debating bandaging the worst segments by laying down heavy duty tarp and securing it with strips of lath just to get it through this Fall and Winter.

I'm dreading the worst in that the entire roof needs to be redone. Any advice on what can be done with it would be greatly appreciated.

Worst spot pic 1

Worst spot pic 2

Worst spot pic 3

Worst spot pic 4


Another section of the roof (1)

Another section of the roof (2)

Another section of the roof (3)


Thanks!
 

Last edited by Shadeladie; 08-30-15 at 09:20 AM. Reason: rules are rules
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  #2  
Old 08-29-15, 09:16 PM
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That's way over due for total replacement.
The wind and cold is going to distroy a tarp.
About the best you could do is total remove the broken ones and replace with new.
All you need is a flat bar, hammer, some 1-1/4 roofing nails.
 
  #3  
Old 08-29-15, 09:20 PM
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Did you happen to get a chance to see my images, I think you replied before I was able to fix the photo links. I'm worried that it may be beyond the point of replacing the broken ones in the worst spot.

Also, do you have any suggestions on how to deal with the missing shingles under any of the curved portions?

I was thinking of using a piece of lath with either foam or rubber behind it to pin the tarp to the roof and prevent the wind from getting underneath the 16mil heavy duty tarp , then screwing it down .about every 6in.
 
  #4  
Old 08-30-15, 07:31 AM
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Yes a saw the pictures.
A tarp is going to look like poop, it's going to cover up the vents unless you cut it and that's the first place it's going to leak.
A roof is one of the most important parts of a home, keep in mind everything you own is below it and is in danger of getting distroyed as well as the added cost for replacing decking, sheetrock, ECT. if it leaks.
Plus possible mold issues.
Something about those brown 3 tab shingles, by far I've seen more roofs with them on it fail then any other.
 
  #5  
Old 08-31-15, 11:04 AM
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Search for "how to fix broken singles" on you tube to get you an idea of what you need to do. You need to really understand on how singles get replaced and how the process of re-roofing involves.

When Joe said you can replaced the broken shingles, he meant you need to (1) remove all the broken singles (2) inspect the surface area of the wood of the singles you just removed because most likely some water got already in (3) get new singles, felt paper (if needed), roofing caulk (whatever that black thing is called), nails.

Tools, you will need a utility knife, hammer, caulking gun, ladder to get to the roof and measuring tape.

Hopefully you don't have to replace any of the sheet panels cuz that's a lot more work (measure, cut, nail). If you are not use to manual label outside, watch out for the heat. OR, you can go to areas where there is some hourly manual laborers and get you one with roofing experience. This option only works AFTER you have educated yourself on how to fix singles very well.
 
  #6  
Old 08-31-15, 11:53 AM
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Get a couple bids to replace the roof. Then I'd see if there's a way to make that happen. As Joe said, leaving this go opens you up to all kinds of new expenses and hassles when it leaks.
 
  #7  
Old 08-31-15, 11:54 AM
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I suspect that water has already gotten underneath as the patches are bubbling up and don't appear to be sticking only to themselves opposed to the wood underneath.

My speculation on this is that the roof is toast in those areas and those whole areas need to be redone including re-tarring or re-cementing or the wind can rip the whole patches right up in bulk.

One of the bubbled areas is 8x14 another is 8x20. Those patched areas do also have chunks of missing shingles.
 
  #8  
Old 08-31-15, 04:52 PM
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When replacing damaged shingles the whole shingle gets replaced.
There is no need for a tape measure or a utility knife in the field.
Only shingles that would get cut are possibly the ones on the ends.
Main reason the life of shingles is shortened is lack of roof venting so they get over heated from the top and bottom.
Looks like you have exposed soffits so likely no one added the simple to install snap in round vents.
All I can see is one small roof vent that may be a bathroom vent, not to a roof vent.
Not even close to enough venting.
 
  #9  
Old 08-31-15, 06:16 PM
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Covering it with a tarp may not be allowed in some communities and I agree it would look like poop.

Selectively patching might get you by, but few reputable contractors would hang their reputation on such a shabby job. Anyone who saw the name on his truck would be certain to never give him a call.

That leaves YOU and I'm not sure how experienced you are or how comfortable you would be working up there. A retired roofer would/could replace many of those bad spots in a couple of days, maybe one day if you helped.

All by yourself, there are tools, ladders and specialty equipment that make a job like that possible. And of course we are here to help.

Bud

PS, get some bids and maybe one of the companies can suggest a way to get past the winter.
 
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